Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,920   Posts: 1,522,060   Online: 874
      
Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 54
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    San Jose, CA, USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    118
    Thanks for the tips!

    Not able to speak for others; but 1/500 at f 6.3 is plenty fast enough to stop action of the types of trains we have here in the US. Most of the places I prefer to go shoot is in the mountains and the trains are going less than 35 mph. I used to use Kodachrome II and Panatomic X in my cameras. Now I use Astia/Provia and Plus-X/Acros. For low light and long lenses I have two other cameras with Provia 400X and Tri-X/Neopan 400.

    For those who are interested, here is some of my work.

    ~Steve Sloan

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Milepost 30 Hudson Divison NY
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    66
    I have been shooting moving trains for the last 35 years. Based upon my experience you should be fine with Acros on sunny days. To achieve what you say you want to, your going to need to work with high shutter speeds and smaller lens apetures to hold the train and to get as much depth of field as possible. If you have fast lens' than you should be okay. If you shoot on cloudy days than you might have trouble holding those parameters.


    I orginally started out in the late 70's shooting in 35mm. After about two years I went to medium format mounted on a tripod. If your serious about shooting trains you might want to think about that as the jump in fine grain and tonality is as different as night and day compared to 35mm.


    It sounds like you are familiar with Rodinal so work with that and see how you like it. It will probably be a little on the grainy side depending on how large a print you make.

    For years my developer was D-76 1:1 but several years ago I switched to a Xtol replensished system. It yields really fine grain negatives with a full tonal range. If you're not comfortable with replenishment then Xtol 1:1 would be a good alternative.

    Hal
    MP 30 Hudson Division

  3. #13
    michael9793's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Fort Myers, Florida, USA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    2,001
    Images
    111
    I just posted today my deal with Acufine and you can shoot at a higher asa/iso that the film indicates. Not sure why the post soak I would be afraid of uneven development if any residual developer was left.
    "Capturing an image is only one step of the long chain of events to create a beautiful Photograph” See my updated website: mandersenphotography.com

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,025
    Rodinal will give you a long straight line and Xtol 1+1 or 1+2 will give you finer grain and smoother tonality at large enlargement, but less bite. It might also tame hot highlights a touch by introducing a slight shoulder.

    If making big prints out of 35mm, I would go for Xtol. It will also give you more film speed than Rodinal (by about 1/2 stop), but as always its about personal opinion. I love rodinal with some films but it can be a bit hot when the sun comes out, unless you are able to develop a whole roll with contrast reduction in mind.

  5. #15
    yeknom02's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    State College, PA, United States
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    308
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    This looks like it was shot in the sun; do you remember what your actual exposure was (f-stop and shutter speed)?
    Unfortunately not, since I never keep notes on anything except large format, which I've just started. I do remember, though, that it was taken when I was in a habit of ignoring the light meter and adhering to the sunny 16 rule, and this was a sunny day. So the odds are very good that it's EV 15, so either 1/125@f/16, 1/250@f/11, or 1/500@f/8. The camera had just been CLA'd, too, so the shutter speeds should be pretty good.
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
    My Flickr Gallery

  6. #16
    tomalophicon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Canberra, ACT.
    Shooter
    Sub 35mm
    Posts
    1,562
    Images
    24
    The best developer is ID-11. Hands down. No competition. Close the thread.

    PS I haven't tried anything else.

  7. #17
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Switzerland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    996
    Images
    2
    I'm not sure if it's "the best", but Fuji's Super-Prodol developer is quite nice for Fujifilms (unsurprisingly). I'm not sure of its availability in the US, but at least in Japan it's rather cheap (only a few dollars for a bag of 1liter mixture).

    http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=super-prodol
    Those who know, shoot film

  8. #18
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    That film looks great in any developer. It is sharp and fine grained, period, and won't show differences between developers as readily as some coarser-grained and less sharp films. You will likely see differences in tonality using box recommendations, but if you are testing for "normal" developing to begin, the differences in tonality between developers will be slighter than you would imagine. Lighting and printing are significantly more important than the film developer used. I would just use whatever I was already using. Or, if you really want to try something new, and since you mentioned economy, how about replenished D-23 (or even one shot D-23)?
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 08-08-2011 at 08:56 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  9. #19
    Leigh B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Maryland, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,035
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by ssloansjca View Post
    3: Post-Soak
    What's a "post-soak"??? Never heard of it.

    Of course, I've only been developing film for 56 years, so perhaps I missed something.

    - Leigh

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    San Jose, CA, USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    118
    Leigh B:

    I "post soak" in water at exactly the same temp of the developer, after development, with inversion agitation, to remove excess developer so there is no chemical reaction with the stop bath. Water is cheap. I store a couple of gallons of water and all my chemicals in the same place.

    Then into the stop it goes, then into fixer. I do not want any temp variation at this step so I do not use a running water rinse until the film is hardened; because in my house that varies a lot. I have never had a problem with this, but I have only been developing film for 20 years less than you have. I was born shortly after you started developing film.

    :-)

    ~Steve

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin