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  1. #21
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssloansjca View Post
    ... to remove excess developer so there is no chemical reaction with the stop bath.
    But a chemical reaction is the whole reason for using a stop bath in the first place.

    - Leigh

  2. #22

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    I use the added step so the transition from developer to stop is less abrupt. Since I cannot use a running water bath at this stage because the temp fluctuates so much, developer, then water bath with agitation then stop, then fix, does a pretty good job in my work flow. Hey, it works for me and I was having reticulation with the running water and pinholes with thin emulsion films going straight from developer to stop.

    ~Steve

  3. #23
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    I've never heard of anybody using running water as a stop bath, nor have I ever seen it recommended in any literature.

    - Leigh

  4. #24

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    I developed half a dozen of rolls of Acros in FX-39, 1+14, 9:00 min, 2 inversions per minute. E.i. 80. Great sharpness and good shadow detail, but the look is a bit dull (long, but rather flat tonal scale*). Maybe I will go back to 9:30, which is what I did my first two rolls with (found it to be a bit dense, that's why I reduced the time), or try 6:30 in 1+9. Anyway, I like both the film and the developer, it's just a question of refining my process.

    cheers,
    sewarion

    *The look I get is quite similar to yeknom02's sample image, as far as it is possible to judge from a scan (I do not scan but only print).

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    [...]
    how about replenished D-23 (or even one shot D-23)?
    have you tested this combination? DigitalTruth says ISO100, 9 minutes. Aside from that, really poor information about this combo in the internet...

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh B View Post
    I've never heard of anybody using running water as a stop bath, nor have I ever seen it recommended in any literature.

    - Leigh

    hi leigh

    if you type in "water" "stop bath" in the apug search bar
    you will see more than 10 pages of threads regarding this subject.

    here is a recent one
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/8...stop-bath.html

    i haven't used stop bath ( only water ) since the 1980s and i learned
    of this sort of thing from a woman i worked for who was trained in
    portrait photography in the 1920s/1930s, so it is a technique that has been around
    for a very very long time ... water instead of stop bath is a topic that
    comes up here once a year ( at least ) ... there are people that suggest
    it should never be done, and others who do it and find nothing wrong with it ...
    one thing using stop bath does is makes your fixer last a little longer
    but as you will read in all the threads on the subject .. it isn't required / necessary ....

    john
    im empty, good luck

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by ssloansjca View Post
    I bought a boatload of this film in 35mm. Here's what I value in the kind of photos I shoot (moving trains):

    1. Long Tonal Scale
    2. Speed (in this case ISO 100) since I shoot moving subjects
    3. Sharpness
    4. Fine Grain
    5. Economy

    Your suggestions are greatly appreciated. I have been considering Rodinal. My normal dilution being 1:25.

    Here is my work flow:

    I keep a couple of gallons of water at the same temp as my developer. There is no possible temp variation from the moment the film is wet until the film is hardened.

    1: Pre-soak
    2: Develop
    3: Post-Soak
    4: 1 minute in stop bath (28% glacial acetic acid diluted 1:32)
    5: Fix four minutes or twice the time to clear the film in Rapid-Fix w/hardner, whichever is longer.
    6: 1-2 running water rinse.
    7: One min in Perma Wash
    8: 5 min running water rinse.

    Your suggestions are greatly appreciated:

    ~Steve Sloan
    steve

    sometimes, what you have on hand, and what you are used to using works best ... no matter what
    what people suggest you use, you will spend a lot of film tweaking your
    way of processing in whatever soup they tell you to use, to get you close
    to the results you want to expect.

    that said ....

    have you ever tried using a coffee based developer for your acros ?
    i have been using "eyeball measured" home roasted caffenol c spiked with 10-20cc of ansco 130 / 750cc of caffenol for years and acros+neopan ( and everything else i shoot ) love the combination.
    i stand develop my negatives for about 25-30 mins depending on when i remember to
    go back to the darkroom to fetch the film.
    before i used caffenol c i used sprint film developer, as well as 1:6 ansco 130
    and they both worked very very well. sprint is like ID11 ( and D76 ) but different
    and ansco130 will give a long tonal scale like it does for prints, for film ...

    have fun !
    ( and YMMV )
    john
    im empty, good luck

  8. #28
    pcyco's Avatar
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    hallo

    in d 23 1+1 or 1+3 no problems
    pushed it to 400 asa with d-23 also no problem.

    i use stop-bath or water rinse - no problems with both variants
    --
    thomas
    ps.: not the best developer but a very good one
    --------------------------------------------------
    vfdkv (259)

  9. #29
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    I have found that the best developers for Acros are D-76, Xtol, Rodinal, and HC-110. I'll bet others are the best too though.
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
    http://www.lightshadowandtone.com

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh B View Post
    I've never heard of anybody using running water as a stop bath, nor have I ever seen it recommended in any literature.

    - Leigh
    Water is very common as a stop bath. With most high quality modern materials there will be no adverse effects with a standard stop bath, but water can be used if you want to maintain a neutral-to-alkaline process from beginning to end. For example some people prefer to use an alkaline fixer, which can reduce washing times significantly. If the alkaline fixer is not a buffered formula then you don't want any residual acid stop bath in the tank. With some staining developers a neutral/alkaline process is also ideal or in some cases required. A water stop usually takes about a minute with frequent changes of water and constant agitation.

    The key things to keep in mind with a water stop:

    1. Development slows to a stop by dilution rather than being halted by the acid neutralization of a standard stop bath. This means when figuring out your developing time you need to take into account the fact that a small amount of development will continue at the beginning of the water stop. No big deal, just means you might have to shorten your development time by a small amount. Since you are stopping the developer by dilution, the residual developer will exhaust very quickly in the highlights and a little less quickly in the shadows so a very small amount of compensation can occur.

    2. Since you need more water to do this than you would stop bath, watch your temperatures. Make sure the water is coming out of the tap at or very near the same temperature as your developer (and rest of process), which you would want anyway for the wash after fixing. Or else prepare the amount of water required in advance and bring it to the proper temperature (same as you would do with your stop bath and the rest of the chemicals). I'm just highlighting that the more volume of liquids you need, the more difficult it can be to maintain temperatures.

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