Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,913   Posts: 1,584,698   Online: 662
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16
  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,435
    Images
    148
    A warm tone print doesn't usually have a really deep black, the Dmax isn't usually as high.

    Often an untoned warm tone print has a greenish clour, selenium toning turns this redder giving a rich warm tone, it's a matter or personal choice and percetion. You can think initially that the selenium has killed the warmth if you compare an untoned warmtone print to one selenium toned, but when you compare to a cold toned bromide print the difference is very significant.

    Compare this to the wedge


    Ian

  2. #12
    joefreeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Wa
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    33
    Ian, I definately have to disagree with you. Both ilford and oriental wt papers have some of the blackest blacks you'll be likely to see.
    Joe Freeman

  3. #13
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,435
    Images
    148
    Quote Originally Posted by joefreeman View Post
    Ian, I definately have to disagree with you. Both ilford and oriental wt papers have some of the blackest blacks you'll be likely to see.
    That depends on how you process them, yes they can have but not when you increase the warmth with development controls.

    It's a matter of perception if you blue tone a print you get a maximum deep blue colour, that's not close to thee best possible Dmax but it's relative to the rest of the blue tones.

    So a warm tone print with a deep brown Dmax still has good visual impact but if you measued the Dmax it's less than the max obtainable with a cold tone developer given full development.

    Ian

  4. #14
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NH - Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,727
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    18
    Ilford Warm Tone used to come on a cream colored base, which really accentuated the warmth of the image. The newer stuff seems to come on the same white base as the MGIV paper. I don't know about the other papers you tested.

    As other's have mentioned it is possible to adjust the image tone with development (over expose and shorter development in a warm tone developer). But I have found that to get a really dark black and a warm toned image on Ilford paper the best results are with the Warm Tone. I just wish they would bring back the old paper base.

    Also, well seasoned Ansco 130 developer tends to color the paper base a tiny bit, and gives a slightly warm tint.

  5. #15
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,381
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by joefreeman View Post
    Ilford ... wt papers have some of the blackest blacks you'll be likely to see.
    The blackest of blacks can not be seen. But I digress...

    Ilford WT can hit 2.5 OD reflectance without much prodding.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  6. #16
    PhotoBob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Victoria, BC CANADA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    526
    Blog Entries
    5
    Images
    211
    Thank you I really appreciate this forum and all the input
    Follow the Light John 8:12
    ~~~PhotoBob

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin