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  1. #11

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    Color film contains less silver halide than BW fims. When developed in a conventional developer the negatives will be rather thin.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  2. #12

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    I process old C-41 film as B&W in a Phenidone/Vit-C developer. I wouldn't even try wet printing but it scans okay. It's a bit grainy but not too bad. I wrote about it here: http://ascorbate-developers.blogspot...d-results.html (this isn't my blog but I contributed the post).

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    But slide film doesn't have an orange mask, right?
    it isn't a orange mask but a yellow one for slide film
    if my apug gallery looks empty you might check these places

    website
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    sell-site

  4. #14

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    Michael ...

    thanks, looks interesting...

    I have a test scheduled now... will be shooting+souping next weds

    in the OLD DAYS '68 or so,,, cross processing was a way of pushing...
    Last edited by ric_kb; 08-12-2011 at 09:51 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: name

  5. #15

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    Jun 2003
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    I accidentally developed a roll of color negative film in Pyrocat HD used as a divided developer. It produced negatives I think dense enough to print in B&W. They certainly scanned well, and the silver image is quite distinct and quite sharp. It was developed in Pyrocat diluted 1:10 from stock, 6 min in A, 6 min in B, 75degrees F. I have no idea how they would print in terms of contrast given the color negative mask color, but the silver image appears to have good contrast.

    Peter Gomena

  6. #16

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    It's the base+dye in C-41 that makes it problematic when doing wet printing. When using a scanner it appears as base fog but otherwise scans fine. The image in the post is as follows:



    It's not manipulated in any way and slight post-processing makes it even better. As I mentioned in the blog post I've tried many devs and this is the best I've been able to do with C-41 in B&W chems so far. I've been using it for a while now and I'm very happy with it.

  7. #17

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    About the colour. It is actually possible to get a (faint) colour image when developing colour film in b&w developer. However, digital processing is necessary to actually see the color and specific film, developer and exposing combonation will help, too. Below is an example with some more info.


    flowers. by brian hefele, on Flickr
    I like my film stirred, not shaken.
    Flickr

  8. #18

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    DD-X 12min@20C. Density a little better than Delta3200@1000.

  9. #19

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    Several threads refer to kodak publication AE-31 for dealing with kodachrome and ektachrome developed as B&W. Just for the record, here's the section of that publication that deals with removing the Orange Stain:

    To remove the stain from KODACHROME and KODAK EKTACHROME Films:
    1. Prepare the bleach bath by dissolving 1 ounce (28 g) of KODAK Citric Acid (Anhydrous) in 1 gallon (4 L) of KODAK Rapid Fixer diluted as recommended for films in the fixer instructions.
    2. Handle only one negative at a time. Treat the negative in KODAK PHOTO-FLO Solution at 75-80°F (24-27°C) for 1 minute. Use fresh solution prepared as directed on the label.
    3. Rinse in water at 75-80°F for 20 seconds.
    4. Immerse in the bleach bath (prepared in step 1) at 75-80°F for 7-14 minutes.
    Stop bleaching if reduction of the silver image becomes apparent. It is better to leave a little stain than to lose the silver image.
    5. Wash the negative thoroughly in running water at 75-80°F for 10 minutes.
    6. Remove water droplets with a soft, viscose sponge. or treat the film with KODAK PHOTO-FLO Solution for 1 minute. Dry the negative.
    Print the negative as you would any normal black-and-white negative.

  10. #20

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    e

    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post

    there are other ways to remove the cast as well through other unmentionable means which traditional purists tend to freak-out about as well....

    have fun !
    john
    I'm neither traditional nor a purist so I'd be very interested if you mentioned them

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