Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,291   Posts: 1,535,449   Online: 934
      
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    176

    How long can ISO 25-400 B&W films be kept?

    For common B&W films, ISO 400 or under, how long can they be kept in a dry cold place, like a freezer, and still reasonably good to use? What is the best record?

    (actually I have this question for color or slide film too).

    My question is caused by following interesting post and picture:

    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=2852

  2. #2
    bobfowler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    New Jersey, Land of the Living Dead
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,440
    Images
    19

    How about one heck of a long time...

    I only wish I had more of it (VPS-III), when these boxes are gone, so ends my stash!
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    601
    Quote Originally Posted by bwfans
    For common B&W films, ISO 400 or under, how long can they be kept in a dry cold place, like a freezer, and still reasonably good to use? What is the best record?

    (actually I have this question for color or slide film too).

    My question is caused by following interesting post and picture:

    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=2852
    ISO 25-50 Speed B&W films last a very long time. They are so slow that backround radiation is not a major factor in their decay. In adition the chemistry of these slow emulsions is very stable. There was a time that Efke didn't even put expiration dates on their PL25 sheet film. 10 years is nothing to these films. I have Panatomic X from the late 70's that is still nice.

    ISO 400 and higher films are the exact opposite. They are sensitive to backround radiation and their chemistry is not as stable as slower films. Even frozen, which retards the chemical decay but not the radiation component you can see increased base fog past expiration. When this base fog becomes an issue is debatable. As Michael Smith has shown significant base fog can be dealt with and very old film used successfully.

    The 100-200 speed films fall in between.

    I recall reading that Sandy King had tested the base fog of Michaels film. Knowing the base fog and how old his film is would give you a feel for what to expect.

    Finally there is a significant difference between a cool place like 50-60 degrees and a freezer. We have seen base fog double from what we measured in new stock just a year after expiration at cool room temperature.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    923
    I have EFKE 100 and R17 that are 30 and 20 years old in the freezer and Panatomic X that sat in a bulkloader unfrozen for 15 years. They are all fine
    Mark Layne
    Nova Scotia
    and Barbados

  5. #5
    gma
    gma is offline
    gma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Texas
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    793
    Images
    9
    I recently developed some 4x5 Agfa APX 100 that expired 7-92 stored in my closet. It was fine with no fogging. I have 25 sheets of Kodak Ektapan (100) that has been frozen since it expired in 1975! I have a new box of Ektapan frozen also. I plan to expose and process sheets from each box and compare.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    1,646
    Images
    5
    Good Evening,

    Just a couple of years ago, I used some Kodak Commercial Copy Film 4127 which was dated early 1980's. The film is rated at 50 (daylight) and 8 (tungsten). The sheets I used had not been frozen, not even refrigerated at any time. Even so, there was just the slightest hint of deterioration (minor apparent fogging) along one side of the image; even that effect may have been caused be a little light somehow leaking into the top edge of the foil package at some point. Right now, I have several hundred sheets of the stuff frozen and expect that it will be just fine several decades hence.

    Konical



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin