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  1. #1
    ColdEye's Avatar
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    what does a red colored developer mean?

    I havesome Ilford Universal Developer that I mixed around June, and when I checked it is color red. What does this mean? Is it still useable?

  2. #2
    Zathras's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColdEye View Post
    I havesome Ilford Universal Developer that I mixed around June, and when I checked it is color red. What does this mean? Is it still useable?
    The red color means the developing agents have oxidized and died. Was this developer diluted from a concentrate? Most diluted developers are used one shot or for one printing session in the case of paper developers.
    When the chips are down,

    The buffalo is empty!!!



  3. #3
    ColdEye's Avatar
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    Yes, diluted by 1:19. I used it one shot. It was in a 1gal container and it is around half gallon now. So it is totally useless now?

  4. #4
    ColdEye's Avatar
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    I use it for developing 35mm and 120 film by the way.

  5. #5
    MattKing's Avatar
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    It will work with film, but it isn't particularly recommended for it.

    It is designed to be mixed up small portions at a time, right before use. Here is an excerpt from the Fact Sheet for Mutigrade and PQ Universal developers on the Ilford website:

    Prepare the working strength solutions of MULTIGRADE and PQ UNIVERSAL developers directly before they are needed. Determine the amount of solution needed for the processing session, making sure that it is a least enough to fill the developing dish/tray to a depth of about half full. Measure out the appropriate amount of concentrate using the smallest measuring cylinder appropriate to the liquid volume: it is easier and more accurate to measure 100 ml of solution in a
    100 ml cylinder than a 1000 ml cylinder.


    Most liquid chemistry is designed the same way - make up only as much as you need just before you need it. It actually is more convenient that way.

    Hope this helps.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #6
    ColdEye's Avatar
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    Urgh! Lesson learned! And I am sure I still have a lot to learn. Thanks for that. Time to put empty soda bottles to use I guess.

  7. #7
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColdEye View Post
    Urgh! Lesson learned! And I am sure I still have a lot to learn. Thanks for that. Time to put empty soda bottles to use I guess.
    I'm not sure I was clear.

    If you have a 1 liter bottle of Ilford concentrate and need to mix 500 ml of 1+9 working solution, just pour out 50 ml from the Ilford bottle into a mixing graduate and add 450 ml of water to make 500 ml of working solution.

    The remaining 950 ml of the concentrate can stay in the Ilford bottle - just replace the cap.

    If you are concerned with greatly extending the life of the concentrate, you can split it into several smaller bottles, but something like a 500 ml bottle of Ilfosol 3 concentrate is projected to last 4 months even if in a half filled bottle.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #8
    ColdEye's Avatar
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    Yes, what you said is what I am planning to do, get what I need from the bottle and mix it to the appropriate amount that I need. I was so excited during the first time I used it (and not reading or reasearching about it) that I mixed a lot of it, thinking I can go through all of it.

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    You just souped your Tri-X with a Merlot...?
    Best regards,

    Bob
    CEO-CFO-EIEIO, Ret.

  10. #10
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    It is oxidization and development byproducts, but it doesn't necessarily mean the developer has died. Give it a whirl. If you have trouble getting rich blacks or clean whites with a properly exposed negative on a 2-3 filter, make up a new batch.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

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