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  1. #1

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    So I managed to get some Kodak HIE, now what?

    Like the title says, I managed to get two rolls of 35mm Kodak HIE at a good price ($20) along with two rolls of Kodak Tech Pan (but that's another story). Now I have to figure out how I'm going to shoot the stuff. This will be my absolute first foray into infrared photography as I've been holding off on it, so I feel like this will be a great opportunity since I'll get to use the now discontinued HIE. I have a few questions for you folks who have worked with this film.

    1) I understand that I have to load the film in total darkness because it will get ruined otherwise as the light will "travel" down the leader and the rest of the film, correct?

    2) The reason I've been holding off trying IR was the fact that I didn't want to have to purchase an IR filter which I would barely use. From what I've read I can get the typical strong IR effects with HIE with just your regular #25 red filter. Is that right, any special cases (developers, etc) that I need to know about?

    3) Here's the big question, what ISO do I shoot it at? What was the standard/box ISO of this film? This brings me to my next question.

    4) I currently regularly use D-76 and Rodinal as my developers, but I also have access to T-Max developer. What would be a good choice and what should I be doing with the developing times (related to question #3)?

    5) Regarding the IR effects, when/what should I shoot to benefit the most from its IR capabilities. I've read that a sunny (no clouds) day is best and I know that foliage goes nuts with IR. How about people, do skin tones do anything interesting? How about buldings, wood, stone, brick, etc?

    Thanks!

    EDIT: I'll most likely be shooting with my Nikon FE, so I'll have TTL metering. Not sure if that matters, but who knows.
    Last edited by Dr.Pain-MD; 08-26-2011 at 02:23 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Pain-MD View Post
    Like the title says, I managed to get two rolls of 35mm Kodak HIE at a good price ($20)

    Now I have to figure out how I'm going to shoot the stuff. This will be my absolute first foray into infrared photography as I've been holding off on it, so I feel like this will be a great opportunity since I'll get to use the now discontinued HIE. I have a few questions for you folks who have worked with this film.

    1) I understand that I have to load the film in total darkness because it will get ruined otherwise as the light will "travel" down the leader and the rest of the film, correct?

    2) The reason I've been holding off trying IR was the fact that I didn't want to have to purchase an IR filter which I would barely use. From what I've read I can get the typical strong IR effects with HIE with just your regular #25 red filter. Is that right, any special cases (developers, etc) that I need to know about?

    3) Here's the big question, what ISO do I shoot it at? What was the standard/box ISO of this film? This brings me to my next question.

    4) I currently regularly use D-76 and Rodinal as my developers, but I also have access to T-Max developer. What would be a good choice and what should I be doing with the developing times (related to question #3)?

    5) Regarding the IR effects, when/what should I shoot to benefit the most from its IR capabilities. I've read that a sunny (no clouds) day is best and I know that foliage goes nuts with IR. How about people, do skin tones do anything interesting? How about buldings, wood, stone, brick, etc?

    Thanks!

    EDIT: I'll most likely be shooting with my Nikon FE, so I'll have TTL metering. Not sure if that matters, but who knows.
    1) Subdued light is OK for loading the film. It doesn't have to be total darkness.

    I never had any problems.

    2) A regular 25A red filter is fine.

    3) Forget about ISO. A good start on a sunny day with a 25A filter is 1/125th of a second at f/11. Bracket a stop each side to make sure you have a usable negative to enlarge.

    4) D-76 or Rodinal should work fine. I always used D-76 without dilution and developed for 11 minutes at 20*C. I know that Kodak suggest 8.5 minutes, but it always came out too flat for me.

    5) You will find out for yourself soon how the subjects you mentioned will record. Some clouds help to make the sky look more dramatic because of the difference in contrast. Have fun.

  3. #3

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    You should load and unload in total darkness. If your camera has a little window to see the film type you should mask it. Certain cameras that read DX code may fog the film - from memory, I think there was often talk about some EOS models doing this.

    I set my camera to ASA 400 and meter through a red 25 filter.

    Midday seems best for IR. Especially after rain in spring time.

    I develop in HC110.
    Steve.

  4. #4
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Hi Dr.Pain-MD,

    I'll let others help with technical matters. I just know that two of my favorite pictures with it were taken in the mountains. So in addition to foliage... distant mountain ranges and lakes go nuts. Have fun!

  5. #5

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    Kodak technical data publication for HIE.

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/f13/f13.pdf

  6. #6

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    Thanks, everyone! I'll keep all that in mind. I really hate bracketing, but I guess I'll do it if I feel like I'll have a good shot in mind. Seeing how you say to start at f11 and 1/125 on a sunnyday, it works out to an ISO of 400 using the sunny-16 rule. That seems to be the consensus based on all the stuff I've seen around the web, I'll use that as a starting point. How about focusing, should I worry too much about using the IR focus point and all that jazz?
    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Tapscott. View Post
    Kodak technical data publication for HIE.

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/f13/f13.pdf
    I went through that earlier, but it's very ambiguous on the exposure. Thanks for the rec though!
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    Hi Dr.Pain-MD,

    I'll let others help with technical matters. I just know that two of my favorite pictures with it were taken in the mountains. So in addition to foliage... distant mountain ranges and lakes go nuts. Have fun!
    We have plenty of those here, I'll do my best.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Pain-MD View Post
    Thanks, everyone! I'll keep all that in mind. I really hate bracketing, but I guess I'll do it if I feel like I'll have a good shot in mind. Seeing how you say to start at f11 and 1/125 on a sunnyday, it works out to an ISO of 400 using the sunny-16 rule. That seems to be the consensus based on all the stuff I've seen around the web, I'll use that as a starting point.

    How about focusing, should I worry too much about using the IR focus point and all that jazz?

    I went through that earlier, but it's very ambiguous on the exposure. Thanks for the rec though!

    We have plenty of those here, I'll do my best.
    My favourite lens for using HIE was my 35mm, so that or wider-angle lenses will work fine when focussed normally for landscapes with the aperture stopped down around f/11.

    You need to shoot a roll and see for yourself.

  8. #8

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    Check out the photos made by Kathy Harcom. Her book 'Light Sensitive' is worth buying if you are interested in her technique for using Kodak HIE infra-red and regular B&W films.
    http://www.kathyharcom.com/

  9. #9
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    Load and unload in total darkness. Way better to be safe than sorry.
    I frequently get decent results by setting iso 200, but it really depends. f11 at 1/125 is a good start, too.
    I use Sprint developer. It's basically a D-76 clone, so that should work as well. I use Sprint at 1:9 for 11 1/2 minutes, IIRC. Massive development chart was way off for me.
    The Laurie White book helped me a lot. It also has a lot of understandable info on how film in general works.

  10. #10

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    I can tell you what I do. I stocked up on HIE once it was officially discontinued so still shoot it regularly. As for exposure, for bright sunny days and using a red 25a filter, I use F9.5 at 1/125. With a 87C filter (totally opaque) I use F6.3 at 1/125. I don't even bother to bracket, if it's bright and sunny, these exposes almost always work.

    I process the film in Xtol 1:1.

    Jim B.

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