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  1. #1

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    Film for bright sunny days?

    Here in Colorado we have more days of really bright clear skies then days with cloudy skies. Hence I am in need of a film that I can use in these conditions. Tmax 400 old emulsion isn't working so well for me. It couldn't handle the high contrast. Delta 400 was about the same. I tend to down rate both of these films. I shoot at iso 320 and develop in D-76.

    I am thinking of maybe Acros as a substitute. It seems to be a very forgiving film and I love the tones it produces.

    I am also thinking of PanF+. I have been doing some research and found maybe down rating it to 25 iso and using stand development at 1+200 for 90 mins might do the trick.

    Does anyone else have a film suggestion?

  2. #2
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    I find the 400 speed films handle the contrast better than the slower films. I suspect you are over developing a bit.

    Having said that, I find Acros to be a very nice film for sunny days. I use lots of it, especially at its low price in 120 format. I also like FP4+, possibly a bit more than Acros. I shoot both films at half box speed.

  3. #3
    Klainmeister's Avatar
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    Acros works fine but you need to compensate by shortening your developing times if you're anything like me and dont like whiteouts everywhere. I end up shooting it at 64 and then underdeveloping by 20% under high contrast situations. Works quite well.
    K.S. Klain

  4. #4

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    I would go with Acros 100 or PanF.

    Jeff

  5. #5
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Rate the film about 1/2 speed slower, then when you develop pull times back about 30%. This will even out contrast some.

    This whole set was shot and developed that way. A very bright, contrasty day at the beach in summer. I think you'll see contrast was controlled quite nicely considering.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rich815...7594171439870/
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
    http://www.lightshadowandtone.com

  6. #6
    vpwphoto's Avatar
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    I agree with everyone here. Cheers... see I can be nice.

  7. #7

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    i love using tmy400 ( old or new ) on bright days and over-exposing a few stops ..
    then developing normally. i use a coffee based developer spiked with a tiny bit
    of ansco130 stock print developer. when i say develop normally, i mean stand develop
    for about 25-30mins. the results are beautiful .. and the film is reproduced via enlarger
    or magic-beam with ease.
    i also do this with sheet film sometimes stand as described ( in an FR tank ) sometimes
    shuffled ( but without the ansco 130 ) for 15-20mins, and get a beefy negative perfect for contact printing. the 4x5 sheets are "a little dense", so you might need a bright light to view them ..

    YMMV
    good luck !
    john

  8. #8
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Why not preexpose each shot by one LV. Then place the shadows on Zone I and the Zone IX highlights will fall on about exposure zone VIII. Might flatten the bottom a little but probably the easiest way to flatten a scene that surpasses exposure latitude.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  9. #9
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Chris, do you use a grey card or white card for the pre-exposure?
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #10
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    I meter a more or less solid subject area (open sky, sunlit wall, etc) through an opaque material. This gives Zone V. I then adjust down four stops and expose through this material at the adjusted setting. This gives Zone one exposure to the film. I then place shadows that might normally fall on zone II on Zone I. This gives roughly an extra stop in latitude by and large.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

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