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  1. #11
    thebanana's Avatar
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    I was going to answer "Kermit", but that would have been wrong
    "While you're out there smashing the state, don't forget to keep a smile on your lips and a song in your heart!"

  2. #12

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    Just to be on the safe side, I buy demineralized water by the gallon at the drug store.

  3. #13
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Photography related "Muppet" question, hmmm..
    Contact Gonzo. He's the photographer Muppet, as I recall. Uses a Speed Graphic. Develops his own. I hear he's quite good.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  4. #14

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    My tap water (2500 foot well) runs a solid 9+ph and has iron bacteria. It tastes fine and is quite soft. But don't even think of using it in developer solutions, B&W or color. It will just about nuteralize them rendering a very flat barely visable image. Seems to be OK in everything else photographic. It will neutralize car batteries and remove acid corrosion on terminals without baking soda.
    Gun Control is like: Reducing drunk driving by making it harder for SOBER people to buy cars.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cruzingoose View Post
    My tap water (2500 foot well) runs a solid 9+ph and has iron bacteria. It tastes fine and is quite soft. But don't even think of using it in developer solutions, B&W or color. It will just about nuteralize them rendering a very flat barely visable image. Seems to be OK in everything else photographic. It will neutralize car batteries and remove acid corrosion on terminals without baking soda.
    pH 9+ is alkaline. Most developers are alkaline, so the water will not neutralize them. (If it interferes with developer chemistry there is some other interaction, but yet you say the water is soft (free of ions).) However, it will tend to neutralize stop bath and fixers which are both acid, as is car battery acid.

  6. #16

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    Your water source is another reason to do your own testing, and why the processing times provided by the manufactures is a suggested starting point. Various components in your water may have some effect on the developer activity. The commercial products from Kodak and presumably Ilford and others are formulated to minimize those differences, but it's still a good idea to test and determine what works best for your conditions.

  7. #17

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    Get You tap water to be checked in a lab, don't fall for standards and the myth that tap water across the globe is one and the same thing.
    Usually they measure water hardness according to the amount of Ca2+ and Mg2+, since they are most prevalent divalent metal ions.
    However, iron, aluminium, manganese etc etc can also be present at elevated levels in some locations.
    To measure water hardness in Europe we use parts per million (ppm), in USA, I think is grains per gallon (gpg).
    What PE said about Kodak chemistry sounds very impressive, I hope he didn't meant only the tap water running around the Kodak plant.

  8. #18
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Kodak Park supplies tap water in 3 forms.

    1. Regular Rochester tap water
    2. Tap water from Hemlock lake - treated in the Kodak plant.
    3. DW-DI water

    We used all 3. Generally, proper buffering for pH problems and use of sequestering agents even out problems, but there are bound to be exceptions, and even so there are some fluctuations in curves. This is very low on the critical list for B&W but higher for color. The use of Ozone, Bromine or Chlorine to sterilize water is of some significance, and formulas in Europe and the US are adjusted for this difference where it exists. I am not familiar with the exact changes.

    PE

  9. #19
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thebanana View Post
    I was going to answer "Kermit", but that would have been wrong
    You need to ask Dr Bunsen Honeydew.


    Steve.

  10. #20

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    "grains per gallon" would be liberal madness. We use sheckel-weight per cubic cubit here in Texas... it was good enough for the patriarchs.

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