Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,906   Posts: 1,555,859   Online: 866
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Wiltshire, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    399

    Potential "muppet" question on water quality?

    Hi there,

    Apologies if this sounds or is a daft question to ask, but...

    Using tap water to mix with print developer, can the chemical quality of the tap water affect how the paper reacts/works?

    Not talking about "sediment" i.e. crud or rubbish debris in the water but the chemical make up of the water - like fluoride in the water. Not specifically concerned with fluoride but any chemical that might be present in tap water and may not be present in "pure" water and if it can affect how a print reacts in the developer.

    Hope this vagueness makes sense, will try to clarify if needed but all responses welcome.

    Cheers,
    Sim2.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada. Ex-California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    346
    Yes, water quality can affect the efficacy of photographic solutions. Just very very little unless the water is very bad. If it is potable (drinkable) then don't worry.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    544
    Quote Originally Posted by Sim2 View Post
    Hi there,

    Apologies if this sounds or is a daft question to ask, but...

    Using tap water to mix with print developer, can the chemical quality of the tap water affect how the paper reacts/works?

    Not talking about "sediment" i.e. crud or rubbish debris in the water but the chemical make up of the water - like fluoride in the water. Not specifically concerned with fluoride but any chemical that might be present in tap water and may not be present in "pure" water and if it can affect how a print reacts in the developer.

    Hope this vagueness makes sense, will try to clarify if needed but all responses welcome.

    Cheers,
    Sim2.
    Hi Sim2,

    Where I live (Northants) is a hard water area. I've never had any problems whatsoever with using mains water to mix developer, stop bath or fixer, toners or other common photo-chemicals. You only need to worry if you mix chems for 'alt' processes, particularly silver nitrate and chems that will mix with it - always use distilled water for these chems. As long as you're using drinking-quality mains water, you'll be fine. :-)

    Cheers,
    kevs.
    testing...

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Near Edinburgh - The Capital of SCOTLAND! - which ain't part of England!
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    11
    I was brought up in Glasgow where the water is very very soft... Up here in Scotland nobody ever bothers with distilled water for things like car batteries and 'furred up' kettles are unknown... Water filters? You just don't need 'em!

    As a kid I safely ignored all the stuff published in books about filtration etc - and had over the years developed my own slight deviations from published developing times etc... At 18 I got a job down in London and moved down there; took me about three months to figure out why the dev technique I'd been using since I was about 11 or 12 was 'all over the place'...

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Wiltshire, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    399
    Thanks for the speedy replies to my vague question, appreciated. At the moment not wanting to be more specific in case it prejudices any thoughts and replies.

    Sim2.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,944
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Quinn View Post
    I was brought up in Glasgow where the water is very very soft...
    It is also very good for making whisky.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada. Ex-California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    346
    I've used tap water on three different continents for developing and printing without problems. I still have the prints and negatives, some of them over four decades old.

  8. #8
    Worker 11811's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,620
    Don't they put chemicals in some commercial product that sequester/counteract impurities that might be present in most municipal and household water supplies?
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Near Edinburgh - The Capital of SCOTLAND! - which ain't part of England!
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    It is also very good for making whisky.
    Aye! 'tis that!

    Tell y'all an odd story though... Some of you might know that the "Red Road" flats in Glasgow (as in the title of the film) are actually a real place - or were until recently as they're bieng demolished.

    -And that's where I was raised.

    One night some 'neds' got onto the roof and poured industrial detergent into the water tanks. - Happened to be a night that I was doing a processing run; and I was at the stop-wash stage where foamy-soapy water was coming out the taps!

    The Dev had obviously been done with some degree of contamination in the water - yet it made no difference to the negs. I'd no clean water to do the wash in - wound up taking the tanks in a bucket to a mate's house in the next block and doing a 1-hour wash!

    I think the point I'm trying to make is it depends WHAT the contaminent is!

  10. #10
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,183
    Images
    65
    Kodak processing solutions for B&W and color have been formulated to work well with either DW or tap water. In fact, when I mixed solutions for tests in the lab, I mixed with DI DW water and with tap water both to compare and test.

    PE

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin