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  1. #11

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    Depends on the specific film and complexion involved. For outdoor portraiture with TMax 100, for example, I like to carry along a light yellow-green filter. I will darken the sky a bit better, and not make
    light complexion look paste-like, like an orange filter would. However, a bit of green will accentuate
    freckles or zits or things like that. My favorite filter for this is Hoya XO.

  2. #12
    CBG
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh B View Post
    Filters do not lighten colors; they darken colors.

    Yellow, being "minus blue", will darken blue while leaving red and green unchanged.
    All true, until one applies a filter factor and adds exposure to compensate for the darkness of the filter. Once one adds the exposure compensation, the subject areas of the same color as the filter will lighten, neutrals will be largely unchanged, and sbject areas opposite to the color of the filter will be darkened.

    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh B View Post
    There may be some overall darkening due to inherent neutral density of the filter, but that's not color-dependent. This is the reason for compensating exposure by the "filter factor".
    The filter factor has to compensate for more than just the - usually - very slight built in neutral density. The manufacturer's recommended filter factor is always a compromise that attempts to retain the relative brightness of neutral surfaces.

    For example with, say, a strong red filter, it takes quite a bit of exposure to bump a middle gray back to middle gray, since one has lost almost all the blues and greens, and absent exposure compensation, neutrals will be dramatically darkened.

    The recommended factor is not an exact science since the color of the light incedent on the subject and the spectral sensitivity of the film all would ideally be part of the factor, and the filter manufaturer cannot anticipate all film choices and lighting conditions.

  3. #13

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    Something else to remember about a yellow, orange, or red filter in sunlight - whatever is not lit directly by the sun (in the shade, or shaded by objects, like the bigger person next to them) will be illuminated by the blue sky only (sometimes called "open shade" if nothing obstructs the object from the sky) and so the skin tones, lit by the blue-influenced illuminating light, may be a bit darker (or "dirtier") than might be expected with these warmer color filters. A fine point, granted, but something to consider.

  4. #14

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    Good info I'v been asking this question also Thanks.

  5. #15

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    Nikon F100, D7000, 35mm F1.8G (DX), 85mm F1.8G, 50mm F1.8G.

  6. #16

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    A yellow-Green filter is the traditional answer, and one which I have never tried, oops.

    If you decide to go in the direction of yellow or orange, remember that the vaguely-yellow sand may be lightened too. Also anything that reduces the dominance of blue light, during cloudless beach visits, will relatively darken the shadows across a face, under a beach-umbrella etc. etc. Of course, that is because the shadows of a direct sun are filled-in naturally by the blue sky. In the right place, a white beach towel held in the sunlight can make a good fill-in reflector under a beach-umbrella or wide hat.

  7. #17
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    Yellow-Green Filter is all you need for the skin tones.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  8. #18

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    The amount of blue in shadows is dependent on % of the sky that is blue, the only sure way is a colour temperature meter... It only takes a few white clouds to turn the shadows 'white', or the sun to go behind a cloud, for the filters effect to change some what.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by williamkazak View Post
    Old thread, things change.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #20
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

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