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  1. #11
    yeknom02's Avatar
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    Mar 2010
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    When you say household bleach, I'm guessing you mean undiluted? I tried pouring some bleach in water to act as a cleaner, but that didn't work.
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
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  2. #12
    sarahfoto's Avatar
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    To clean out old cordial bottles you can use spirit vinegar 24%. Don't know if it's called the same in the states but in Sweden it's used for lots of things. Cleaning out coffeebrewers, pickling etc. Could be worth a try?

  3. #13
    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
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    I use a revolving metal brush bottle cleaner (click on picture to enlarge):

    http://store.menietti.it/enotecnica/...o-manuale.html

    By pulling and pushing the end knob, the metal brush is put in a fast rotating and up-and-down movement. The brush will expand to fit any size of bottle. The bottle is also kept stable by the handle, which plugs into the bottle neck, so you don't need "a third hand" to operate. The cleaning effect of the metal brush is extremely strong and will remove even the most adhesive stains in few strokes.

    The item is easily found for sale in wine technology shops in Italy; I suppose it is available in the States too.
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
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  4. #14

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    Jan 2005
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    Downers Grove Illinois
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    It is indeed silver that has precipitated from solution.

    Some remains and will deposit on the next film or it will dump with the liquid fix and deposit. You will be able to abrade it off carefully when film is still wet but you risk scratching. It is metal. Once dry, it is there for life.

    Which is why as a low volume user I do not reuse film fix on film.

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