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  1. #21
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Hi Andrew

    When Kodak changed the bleach strength I was very pissed, really strong so I decided to switch to the above.
    Proper mix is 32 grams to 8 litres, but I find this way to strong for Ilford warmtone so I added and extra 6 liters and did the 5 second thing. put the print in, count 5 steamboats once the whole print is covered with bleach, walk print over to large wash tray and hose down immediately.
    I think that this mixture at 1:8 is much like the kodak stuff,
    I haven't used the Kodak stuff for awhile now thanks to Ian Grant, I am getting my PHD in chemistry from him and I like the control.

    The trick as I see it is to just hardly notice the tone when you dump it in the toner B solution.

    Have any of you notice that the print seems to get more browner as it washes???
    this has always really pissed me off and I have wasted lots of good prints trying to get a tone I like in the final print.


    Bob


    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Moxom View Post
    Bob.... Great info, but have some questions. How does your sepia formula compare to the Kodak Sepia II kits ?? If I remember right, you used to use those when they were available? I still have some of the sepia II kits and actually dilute the Part A way more than the stock solution kodak recommends. Something like a 1:6 dilution versus stock solution because it virtually irradiates the paper of you keep it stock for their recommended time. Just wondering if your formula for Part A is the roughly the same strength as a STOCK Kodak part A? 5 seconds dunk and rinse sounds VERY short so I assume it must be stock solution strength?

    Andy

  2. #22

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    Bob - I'm across the Bay from SF. My house and studio will probably still be in disarray next spring due to
    remodeling, but if you are in the area it might be beneficial to meet since we have so many things in common photographically. Me and one of my primary photo students have been trying to get together a
    major exhibition gig in this area, or at least I'd like to have something like that up and running before I
    retire from my day job. He has some significant real estate which might have options. Might be nice to meet him too if he's around. We both travel some.

  3. #23
    eclarke's Avatar
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    Bob, I use WT exclusively and get a nice, slightly warm tone by developing in Ansco 130, replacing the bromide with 15cc 1% benzotriazole solution/liter, 1+3 @73 deg.F and selenium toning..no muss no fuss..Evan Clarke

  4. #24
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    How about using single solution brown toner? Could a short treatment get something similar?

    I have the Arista sepia that matches the old Kodak but haven't mixed it up yet. Same with the replacement for brown toner. I like this result - for some images a yellower sepia works but not for nearly as many as this subtle touch.

    I haven't experimented with this paper yet much less toned it but I have some and will be doing so this weekend.

  5. #25
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Roger
    I have never been big on those single brown toner, some of them really were problematic to work with, leaving a scum on the print surface that had to be washed a second time.
    Also I am trying for a hint of tone.

    Bob
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    How about using single solution brown toner? Could a short treatment get something similar?

    I have the Arista sepia that matches the old Kodak but haven't mixed it up yet. Same with the replacement for brown toner. I like this result - for some images a yellower sepia works but not for nearly as many as this subtle touch.

    I haven't experimented with this paper yet much less toned it but I have some and will be doing so this weekend.

  6. #26
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Evan
    Can the Ansco 130 be mixed from scratch??
    If so could you enlighten me with the formula?
    I do not want to get into buying package materials in the future, I am prepared
    to replace Dektol with a scratch formula.

    I sometimes use incredibly large volumes of chemicals as I do a lot of murals
    so a scratch formula is where I want to go.
    sounds like an interesting option.

    Bob
    Quote Originally Posted by eclarke View Post
    Bob, I use WT exclusively and get a nice, slightly warm tone by developing in Ansco 130, replacing the bromide with 15cc 1% benzotriazole solution/liter, 1+3 @73 deg.F and selenium toning..no muss no fuss..Evan Clarke

  7. #27
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Drew
    I am humming and hawing on a Aztek premier and would either buy a used and have them refurb or bite the bullet and get a new one, that may happen this year or next .. If so I will definately be in California for a period of time.
    check into my thread on Kentucky, you will see an interesting concept.. Traveling photographic shows,, I am taking over 500 framed pieces to Louisville to exhibit, all printed here with different process.
    Right now I am really enamored with central USA and travel to Kentucky, SC and again to Georgia before I plan to head west.
    Bob
    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    Bob - I'm across the Bay from SF. My house and studio will probably still be in disarray next spring due to
    remodeling, but if you are in the area it might be beneficial to meet since we have so many things in common photographically. Me and one of my primary photo students have been trying to get together a
    major exhibition gig in this area, or at least I'd like to have something like that up and running before I
    retire from my day job. He has some significant real estate which might have options. Might be nice to meet him too if he's around. We both travel some.

  8. #28
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie View Post
    Roger
    I have never been big on those single brown toner, some of them really were problematic to work with, leaving a scum on the print surface that had to be washed a second time.
    Also I am trying for a hint of tone.

    Bob
    I've used conventional sepia but always bleached to completion, or as far as it looked like it was going to go, to get the warm yellowish brown color. I'd like your hint of tone. I'll try the brown toner and report back. If I have time I may also try the conventional sepia using your suggestions.

  9. #29

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    Bob - I always mix 130 from scratch. Benzotriazole can be sub for KBr in lesser quan for a slightly different image color. An excellent dev if you intend to split tone afterwards, or quite lovely by itself.
    Roger - Kodak brown toner works well but must be very carefully monitored since the full effect is not
    apparent until well into the wash cycle. I dilute the toner to 1/4 the strength recommend by Kodak, rarely tone more than half a minute, and then instantly plunge the print into a tray of fresh water and agitate to evenly slow the reaction of the toner. If you let it drip off the print you'll get streaks or spots.

  10. #30

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    Oh, one more comment on 130 - you can only keep the glycin for so long once it's exposed to air. I open
    only one bottle of powder at a time, and keep a reserve 100g bottle totally sealed in the freezer. Fresh
    glycin will be a pale tan. As it ages it turns light mocha. This is where things really get interesting. When
    it is completely fresh you have almost no staining effect and can determine the coldness of the print by
    choice of restrainer (bennz vs KBr), dev time, and final toning. When the glycin is partially aged you begin to get a wonderfully subtle stain or glow to the highlts of the paper itself. However, once the glycin has overoxidized and the powder has turned a deep chocolate color, it will produce a tea-colored
    cast over the entire print, sometimes attractive, sometimes annoying. So you can fine-tune your intended effects by aging your supply of glycin to a certain point.

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