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  1. #31
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    I just don't see how there will be any chemical remaining after the bottles are washed. I mean there is surely an acceptable threshold amount for ingestion of fixer...if I accidentally drop my tongs and splash 1 drop of fixer into my mouth I don't die. There should be way less than 1 droplet of fixer left in the bottles after I wash them out with soap and hot water and a bottle brush. If photochemistry is that bad for you, I should be dead soon...I don't even wear gloves and touch the chemicals with my bare hands!
    f/22 and be there.

  2. #32
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    It is frankly not worth the risk...per the CDC....

    "1.4 HOW CAN SILVER AFFECT MY HEALTH?
    Since at least the early part of this century, doctors have known that
    silver compounds can cause some areas of the skin and other body tissues to
    turn gray or blue-gray. Doctors call this condition "argyria." Argyria
    occurs in people who eat or breathe in silver compounds over a long period
    (several months to many years). A single exposure to a silver compound may
    also cause silver to be deposited in the skin and in other parts of the body;
    however, this is not known to be harmful. It is likely that many exposures to
    silver are necessary to develop argyria. Once you have argyria it is
    permanent. However, the condition is thought to be only a "cosmetic" problem.
    Most doctors and scientists believe that the discoloration of the skin seen in
    argyria is the most serious health effect of silver."


    per
    http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/tp146.pdf

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    I just don't see how there will be any chemical remaining after the bottles are washed. I mean there is surely an acceptable threshold amount for ingestion of fixer...if I accidentally drop my tongs and splash 1 drop of fixer into my mouth I don't die. There should be way less than 1 droplet of fixer left in the bottles after I wash them out with soap and hot water and a bottle brush. If photochemistry is that bad for you, I should be dead soon...I don't even wear gloves and touch the chemicals with my bare hands!
    There are many things we can "get away with", but they are usually things we shouldn't invite onto ourself without good reason. The cost of a few bottles is not good enough reason.

    Your lack of understanding of the underlying processes is what makes you dangerous to yourself and others.

    It is not a question of a few drops of fixer remaining. There will be no drops remaining after you've rinsed it a few times. What is at issue is the deposits on the walls of the bottles, seen or unseen. Those deposits can leach into the beer as it sits over time. Those deposits are likely to contain complexes of silver and silver compounds.

    You can likely get away with using the bottles for beer in that you will live in the short run, but at what cost? You never know what cell may go cancerous or when. You never know which molecule of silver complex may be the tipping point which initiates liver problems.

    Would you feed your children food out of the older fixer bottles? Your wife? Your best friend?

    Would you tell them? What would they do to you if you did tell them?

    Every time you took a sip from your bottle, you'd be asking yourself, "Is this the one?"

    Are you nuts?

  4. #34

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    Unless you aggressively remove any silver deposits, you might have a problem. The fixer is easy to remove, and probably not as bad for you as automatic dish washing detergent.

    Why did you waste a brown glass bottle on fixer? It keeps just fine in a PETE plastic soda bottle.
    Bob

  5. #35
    Athiril's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    I just don't see how there will be any chemical remaining after the bottles are washed. I mean there is surely an acceptable threshold amount for ingestion of fixer...if I accidentally drop my tongs and splash 1 drop of fixer into my mouth I don't die. There should be way less than 1 droplet of fixer left in the bottles after I wash them out with soap and hot water and a bottle brush. If photochemistry is that bad for you, I should be dead soon...I don't even wear gloves and touch the chemicals with my bare hands!
    As above, bottle still smells strongly of just tomato sauce, I guess you could wash the bottle out with laundry bleach a few times. Hypochlorite should dissolve silver and silver halides just fine (and other silver compounds). Then wash and deal with the hypochlorite remnants.

    I still don't know why you'd want to though. Stuff embeds in plastic. You're not even supposed to re-use water bottles for water, as stress placed on the plastic (light, heat, squeezing, bending etc) releases chemicals over time.

  6. #36

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    I can hardly believe this thread is real...

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by zsas View Post
    Since at least the early part of this century, doctors have known that
    silver compounds can cause some areas of the skin and other body tissues to
    turn gray or blue-gray. Doctors call this condition "argyria."
    Also known as "Smurfitis!"
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  8. #38
    Athiril's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    Also known as "Smurfitis!"
    I initially read smurfitis as something else....

  9. #39

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    http://www.sciencelab.com/msds.php?msdsId=9922934 a MSDS for ammonium thiosulfate, slightly toxic, 1gm/kg of body weight isn't good for a guinea pig(LD50).
    Untested on humans.

    http://www.rbnainfo.com/MSDS/US/FINI...er-English.pdf This is the phosphates removed from dishwasher detergent. Similar LD50 quantities to fixer.

    http://www.rbnainfo.com/MSDS/US/FINI...US-English.pdf


    Not nice stuff in all of them, but the latter two are used in the kitchen.

    Now what is/was in your used fixer, who knows.
    Bob

  10. #40

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    bettersense

    buy a bottle capper and a few empties or empty wine bottles from a brew-store,
    or a pony-keg and you won't have to bottle the beer at all ..

    even though you may wash the bottles clean, steam them, and bleach them
    it might make people who drink from the bottles feel more a ease if they didn't ever contain fixer ...

    i know of someone who was in the south pacific in a hospital and near him
    was a repurposed container that used to have something deadly in it ...
    he still thinks about it ( and jokes about it ) 20+years later.
    Last edited by jnanian; 09-13-2011 at 10:33 AM. Click to view previous post history.



 

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