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  1. #81

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    make sure you have some of these to label your bottles
    so at least you know which ones contain the mickey finn

    http://www.google.com/search?q=skull...w=1148&bih=940

  2. #82
    yeknom02's Avatar
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    It seems that the original issue is long since resolved by now.

    As a side note, I'm wondering what the effect of recycling would be, since it was brought up as the best option. Assuming that you would recycle the glass bottles, I'm wondering if (a) they are able remove deposits from the glass and (b) what effect that will have on future generations of recycled glass material. Needless to say, I'm pretty ignorant of what goes on after I place my recyclables in the bin. (But at least I try to do that much!)
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
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  3. #83

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    Quote Originally Posted by yeknom02 View Post
    I'm wondering what the effect of recycling would be, since it was brought up as the best option. Assuming that you would recycle the glass bottles, I'm wondering if (a) they are able remove deposits from the glass and (b) what effect that will have on future generations of recycled glass material. Needless to say, I'm pretty ignorant of what goes on after I place my recyclables in the bin. (But at least I try to do that much!)
    When the glass is melted, any silver deposits would come to the top of the melt as dross and be skimmed off, or sink to the bottom and remain there with other heavy melted sludge and not be drawn off for use in glass objects. Any silver atoms that remained in the body of the melt would be dispersed so widely that they would end up inside the body of any glass objects. The quantity of silver available at the surface of any resulting finished glass would be measured in parts per billion or (more likely) in parts per trillion, if it were measurable at all.

  4. #84
    Usagi's Avatar
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    I wonder.. Here where i live, glass and pet bottles recycled. Now petbottles are crunched and the plastic is used to manufacture lower quality (not sure) plastic.
    Glass beer bottles etc. Are still reused.

    So how bottles are cleaned? Nobody knows how bottle is used before someone returns it...for glass bottles there are more effective cleaning methods than for pet bottles. I guess.

    But how did/does beer and other drink factories check whether one bottle contains some poisonous chemical?

  5. #85
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    In the old days when glass bottles were returnable, they were washed in hot water and caustic soda then steam cleaned before they were refilled and sent out again.

    They still make bottle sanitizing machines: http://www.sidel.com/Your-Markets/Wa...ne/Washer/AQUA
    Last edited by Worker 11811; 09-15-2011 at 04:23 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Randy S.

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  6. #86
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I do not disagree with PE. However if we look at magnitude of injury to your body, the EtOH in the beer would be the most dangerous to your health by orders of magnitude.

    So I say go ahead and do it.

  7. #87
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    The guidelines for our community recycle program advise against recycling bottles that have been in contact with chemicals.

  8. #88

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    All,

    If the OP wants to re-use his Grolsch bottles, despite our warnings, who are we to stop him? Enjoy your beer, BetterSense, and since you obviously know better, don't complain to us when your beer is tainted with silver deposits. :-@
    Last edited by kevs; 09-15-2011 at 05:11 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: + :-@
    testing...

  9. #89
    Scheimpflug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    In the old days when glass bottles were returnable, they were washed in hot water and caustic soda then steam cleaned before they were refilled and sent out again.

    They still make bottle sanitizing machines: http://www.sidel.com/Your-Markets/Wa...ne/Washer/AQUA
    The Coke I buy at the store a few miles down the road comes in reused glass bottles. It's pretty interesting - the bottles are all different ages, different logos, different shapes, different levels of wear, etc. I don't think the bottles are "returnable" in that sense in the USA, but the USA seems to have no problem importing products in bottles returned in Mexico.


    If you're concerned about the bottles being reused as-is without being melted down first, a simple solution would be to break them before recycling the glass.

  10. #90
    Scheimpflug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    The guidelines for our community recycle program advise against recycling bottles that have been in contact with chemicals.
    Perhaps for the safety of the workers who have to sort & process those bottles?

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