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  1. #1

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    Yellow stains on Adox MCP?

    I've included some images but as they were taken with my camera phone, I don't own a digital camera, the yellow spots are hard to see. If you look carefully at the shot with the back of the girls head you can see the yellow in the blown out parts of her hair, top left. In the bicycle shot you can see it on the bottom right (Five o' clock)

    The entire package of paper did this, every print. I fix for the recommended time, and wash extensively. After the first problem occurred I washed these prints for over an hour.

    I showed the prints to a few people and they said there was water on them at some point of manufacture. I've had this problem with other batches of ADOX but never to this extent.

    Can anyone tell me what this is? How to correct it?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails mail.jpg   IMG_20110912_220130.jpg  

  2. #2

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    The pictures are harder to see than I thought. I can't control the white balance on the camera phone and that makes it even harder.

  3. #3
    piu58's Avatar
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    I tried to balance the colors of one of the images out . I can see a yellow spot quite easily near the lower border:
    ---
    Uwe Pilz

  4. #4

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    That's it! Thanks for your help. Now what is it and what can I do to prevent it in the future?

  5. #5
    Willie Jan's Avatar
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    Did you ask adox themselves?
    If it is a failure in the product you will get a new package i guess.
    I had some problems with 4x5 film some years ago and got new ones for free.

  6. #6
    ADOX Fotoimpex's Avatar
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    From what I can see these look like fixer stains but ofcourse this is hard to tell with these images.

    Did you process every sheet individually in the trays or can it be that you have kept several sheets in the fixer/water at once?

    During manufacturing there will get no water on the prints after drydown else they would glue together either on the roll or as a sheet.
    But even if water got onto the sheets there should be no yellow stains arising from this. All emulsion is aquaous when coating and then dries. Rewetting it and drying it can lead to physical border effects around the wet spot but not to a colour change (at least as far as I know).
    In this case you could see the wrinkles when you pull a sheet from the black bag.

    If they don´t show on the paper prior to processing they originate most likely in the process.

    Which "other problems" did you encounter with our papers?

    I am a bit wondering about people posting threads like this in public forums rather than contacting the manufacturer.
    Next to helping you as a customer we also need feedback. For the very unlikely event that in fact there is a manufacturing problem we need to be able to isolate batches and check on things.

    Kind regards,

    Mirko
    Last edited by ADOX Fotoimpex; 09-13-2011 at 05:10 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #7
    Marco B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ADOX Fotoimpex View Post
    From what I can see these look like fixer stains but ofcourse this is hard to tell with these images.

    Did you process every sheet individually in the trays or can it be that you have kept several sheets in the fixer/water at once?
    This was my thought also, the papers may simply not be properly fixed or washed. If not properly fixed due to papers touching each other or otherwise, the yellow stain may be a small amount of colloidal silver (very small silver particles, much smaller than developed silver) that printed out from unfixed silverhalide. That could show up as a yellow stain. Or the fixer isn't washed out properly, possibly also leading to some colloidal silver deposits.
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  8. #8

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    Hi,

    From what I can see these look like fixer stains but ofcourse this is hard to tell with these images.

    Did you process every sheet individually in the trays or can it be that you have kept several sheets in the fixer/water at once?

    During manufacturing there will get no water on the prints after drydown else they would glue together either on the roll or as a sheet.
    But even if water got onto the sheets there should be no yellow stains arising from this. All emulsion is aquaous when coating and then dries. Rewetting it and drying it can lead to physical border effects around the wet spot but not to a colour change (at least as far as I know).
    In this case you could see the wrinkles when you pull a sheet from the black bag.

    If they don´t show on the paper prior to processing they originate most likely in the process.

    Which "other problems" did you encounter with our papers?

    I am a bit wondering about people posting threads like this in public forums rather than contacting the manufacturer.
    Next to helping you as a customer we also need feedback. For the very unlikely event that in fact there is a manufacturing problem we need to be able to isolate batches and check on things.

    Kind regards,

    Mirko
    I would like to point out that I in no way placed blame, but merely asked a question about the possible origin of these issues. I distinctly asked "what is this and how can I correct it?" which implies no blame, so please don't infer something that isn't there. The suggestion that it was water on the paper came from a friend who is knowledgable about photography but it doesn't mean they're right, it was just speculation on their part and I recognized it as such which is why I came to this forum to see if anyone had any insight. Why bother the company if I'm making some error? I also know I don't know everything so I come to my peers for help.

    Other than this particular problem I haven't had any issues with the paper but I've had it a few times. I also assumed that the prints weren't washed enough so I washed them excessively (one hour) but the problem continued. I might be making another error somewhere else. I process one print at a time with a timer in my left hand for active awareness. For these prints I used Dektol 1:2 for 60 seconds, kodak regular stop bath 48 ml in 1000 ml of water for 30 seconds and (kodak rapid fixer without hardener) single bath fixing (these are RC) for 60 seconds. I then take the tray out of the darkroom and put under running water in a kitchen sink to wash it. I normally wash for about ten minutes, just to be sure, with wet hands I carefully massage the print as I was told by a old friend who's been printing for 40 years that this would speed the removal of the fixer. I then place the prints face down on screens to dry. One of the things my friend who said it water noticed was that it seemed to occur in the same areas of each print if there was a distinct highlight in the same spot/area of the paper.

    Out of the box the paper looks perfect, no defects that I can see, no waves, no spots, literally nothing that's apparent under safelight conditions.

    I actually hope that it's something that I'm doing and can correct, I love this paper. I've got 48 images to print by October 6th for a show and I shot and will print all of this on the knowledge that I have with this paper. Moving to something else would be like reinventing the wheel. Could it be the massaging? I keep my hands clean but you never know?

    -Puma

  9. #9
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Each of the times you refer to (time in developer, time in stop bath and time in fixer) seem to me to be bare minimums - I would definitely try lengthening them by at least 30 seconds each.

    I would also avoid the massaging - seems likely to increase the likelihood of physical damage to an RC print. It might make more sense with a fibre based print.

    One final suggestion - check your screens! Contamination can definitely hide there.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #10
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    I seem to remember having a similar problem with my paper of choice, a very long time ago. Sometimes I'd have great prints, then some would start to show this type of yellow staining.

    I tried a few things also; first I thought perhaps I wasn't washing long enough too, but then I noticed that it seemed to happen when water pooled on the print as it dried. I decided to do 2 quick tests:

    • print as per my normal routine and use some fotoflow as a final bath after washing thoroughly - and hang to dry. The staining disappeared.
    • print as per my normal routine final wash as per normal and dry on blotting paper wiping off excess water with a *very* soft sponge. Once again, the staining disappeared.


    The excess water obviously was retaining some chemical (most probably fixer) and by pooling on the prints, due to my error, ended up staining the finished print.

    Since changing my wash and dry methods, this has become an error of my past - and a good learning experience too!

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