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Thread: Processing HP4?

  1. #1
    Dear's Avatar
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    Processing HP4?

    I bought a Yashica 44 LM and got a few rolls of outdated film along with the camera.
    One of them is Ilford HP4.
    That's all good, but the problem is that I have no clue of how long I should develop it?
    I only have HC-110 and ID-11 available.
    Can anyone recommend developing times for this film with one of these chemicals?
    I'm not looking for advise on wether or not to use it, 'cause I certainly am gonna try just for the fun of it!

  2. #2
    Ottrdaemmerung's Avatar
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    B&W film doesn't lose much with being outdated, unless it's decades old, so go ahead and use developing times listed at www.digitaltruth.com .
    website | Flickr
    "Embrace the negative with absolution, your final positive reward." --IQ, "The Province," Frequency

  3. #3
    Dear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ottrdaemmerung View Post
    B&W film doesn't lose much with being outdated, unless it's decades old, so go ahead and use developing times listed at www.digitaltruth.com .
    I tried that but I can't seem to find the times for HP4.
    And it probably IS decades old!
    I don't know exactly how old this one is, as it was without the cardboard case, only the paper wrapping

  4. #4
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    EDIT - deleted former post - didn't notice you said a 44. That's 127 film, no? New film is of limited variety and expensive, so NOW I understand trying to save the old stuff!
    Last edited by Roger Cole; 09-15-2011 at 07:41 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    HP4 IS decades old, so you won't find it there.

    If it was the predecessor of HP5 then it's probably ISO 400. By now it's probably dropped its effective speed quite a bit, so it's probably more like ISO 100 or less by now.

  6. #6
    onepuff's Avatar
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    HP4

    HP4 was available between 1964 and 1976 and was rated at 400-650 ASA. There is a booklet here http://www.photomemorabilia.co.uk/Il..._in_Action.pdf with some details on developing etc.
    " ... a cook who relies on nothing but a sharp knife has no guarantee of producing excellent dishes." - Yoshihisa Maitani

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    Why not ask Simon what the best approach would be?
    I assume you don't have info on how it was stored ?

    OP: Simon Galley is a Ilford rep and valued member here on apug.
    He will set you straight I'm sure.

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    Hi,

    I developed a roll film a few years ago. When I contacted Ilford they gave me these times:

    400 ISO in ID-11
    35 mm: high contrast 15 mins. normal contrast 9 mins
    120 rollfilm: high contrast 14 mins. normal contrast 10 mins

    400 ISO in Microphen
    35 mm: high contrast 13 mins. normal contrast 7 mins
    120 rollfilm: high contrast 12 mins. normal contrast 8 mins

    Note how 35mm film needs less time than 120 for normal contrast, but more for high. That's not a mistake.

    I expect 127 is basically the same as 120?

    When I developed my film I found it was VERY foggy. Still printable, with difficulty, but as already mentioned drop the film speed down a couple of stops. Microphen might be a better bet as it produces less background fog than ID-11 - but to be honest I doubt it will make a lot of difference. Not worth buying for just one film.
    Steve

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    Ottrdaemmerung's Avatar
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    Oops, my mistake! I was thinking of FP4+. I often get Ilford's films confused: FP4, HP5...
    website | Flickr
    "Embrace the negative with absolution, your final positive reward." --IQ, "The Province," Frequency

  10. #10
    hpulley's Avatar
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    Maybe HC-110 for even lower fogging? 5:00 dilution B 1+31 at 68F/20C would be something to try.
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