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  1. #11
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Thanks everybody!

    This is great news actually. No more dish soap for me... this will definitely get me on to admiring my negs much quicker.

    It also makes sense that soap is unnecessary (and potentially harmful) since there are no oils to break down. The things you learn...



    Oh, and PE, with all the money you're getting from these workshops it's probably time to add another story onto your home.... right?!
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  2. #12
    jp498's Avatar
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    I don't use soap either. I just rinse everything well and (since I have a dedicated darkroom) leave it to dry. When it's dry, I put it away. I don't want wet patterson reels stored on the shelf, especially looking like they are ready to use. I don't vacuum or dust; I just leave a small cheap honeywell air cleaner going much of the time to keep things dust free in there.

    Some 90% alcohol for the last step will get you admiring your negatives quicker too. Sold with the antiseptic products in the pharmacy section of your local big box retailer.

  3. #13
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Frankly, I'm losing money!

    I hope that book and DVD sales will finally balance the books.

    PE

  4. #14
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Maybe a little anal for most, but I clean up as I go. The processes used to develop various films are identical every time (that's the idea, right?), so I know in advance exactly what equipment will be used and need to be cleaned. I just do that cleaning as I finish up the final use of each equipment item.

    At the end of the session I have only the most recently used items left in the sink. These are finished off while the film washes. I then do a final distilled water rinse, hang the film to dry, and immediately get out to keep from stirring up any residual dust.

    When I return to take down and store the dried negatives the darkroom is already cleaned up and completely put away.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  5. #15

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    For developing, I rinse as I go.

    For printing, I wash everything at the end, which can take some time.

    I have started using this
    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/998414...oz.?cat_id=305
    Recommended to me by Freestyle folks.

    I dilute it and put it in one of those spray bottles, spray a few shots onto whatever equipment I am washing. It seems to work well. I also use it to clean off counter top and etc. I finally used it undiluated the other day, to clean off some tough spots on my stainless steel table.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I leave everything in a mess and when it becomes too intolerable, I move my darkroom to another room in the house. It gets messy after a bit, but you learn to live with trays, film chips, paper fuzz and chemicals smells everywhere. You just have to keep the kids and pets from drinking out of the trays.

    We are running out of rooms! HELP!!!!!

    PE
    Yes and Mrs PE has won the "most saintly wife in the U.S." every year for longer than anyone can remember


    Well its not surprising, is it?

    pentaxuser

  7. #17
    ROL
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    Well, I applaud your clean up ethic, permanent darkroom or no. The essence of good technique is to clean as you go, as much as is possible, thus avoiding future contamination and inconsistent results. This also makes for a more pleasant work environment, particularly if shared. It is responsible and respectful. For myself, I just rinse everything well with plenty of hot water during and after each session – soap is generally overkill for most darkroom chemisty and simply one more group of chemicals, to rinse out.

  8. #18
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    My clean up times come after a printing session with FB. I finish the second fix of all prints at once fished from a holding tray, rinse and HCA, then off into the rocking rack or if really big, a larger 20x24 tray with tray syphon. leave it to run for twenty minutes or so, and spend 20 minutes cleaning up. Turn off water and then go to bed. Finish washing in the morning.

    I usually wash up with a non-ionic lab detergent. It is amazing, and leaves virtually no residue. No slippery residue when handling wet glasswear I will dig up the name if any are interested.
    my real name, imagine that.

  9. #19

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    Also, to make things a little neater and cut down on post development cleaning I only use one graduate when doing small tank B&W. I mix D76 1:1, dump it in, then during however many minutes it's developing I rinse out the graduate and fill it with stop. After the stop, since there is no huge rush to go from stop to fix, I dump the stop back in my storage bottle, give the graduate a quick rinse, shake out some of the water, and fill it with fixer. Then while it's fixing I can wash the graduate and just dump the fixer straight from the tank to the storage bottle when that's done.

    When all is said and done, I wash the lid and light trap real quick then start the film rinse / hypo clear / wash cycle. By the time that is done, the tank and reel have washed themselves and I really don't have much cleanup. BTW I do all this in my rather smallish kitchen with one sink, so using this process helps keep it from being overrun with junk.

  10. #20

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    My darkroom is a cupboard under the stairs. I'm lucky to have a Nova slot processor and so there's very little to clean up after printing and also little to set up before printing. I normally give the processor a wipe with a kitchen towel and turn off the thermostat. Once per year I give it a really good scrub to get rid of the crud.
    Steve.

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