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  1. #1

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    Split toning purple/brown?

    I'm interested in doing some split toning. I really like the look of brownish / sepia highlights with more of a purple cast in the shadows. Ilford Warmtone paper will get the highlights about where I want them, but is there something that will change the shadows to what I want without affecting the highlight areas? I'd actually prefer something that might open up the shadows a touch, but that's not a requirement. I'm not looking for a huge purple shift, just something subtle.

    I'll post an example of one I did with a scanned negative in Adobe Camera Raw. I'd like to do this for real if possible. I'm thinking Selenium on warmtone paper might get me there but I'll leave to the experts

    Thanks for all your help


  2. #2
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Sepia as you suggest for the highlights,
    very strong dilution of selenium just to hit the shadows.
    1:3 or 1:2 for about a minute or judge by taste.
    Do the highlights first.

  3. #3

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    Sepia/selenium is what I would try. Don't use the sepia bleach for too long.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  4. #4
    MaximusM3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie View Post
    Sepia as you suggest for the highlights,
    very strong dilution of selenium just to hit the shadows.
    1:3 or 1:2 for about a minute or judge by taste.
    Do the highlights first.

    Bob,

    Question: if one wants to use thiourea to achieve the same effect, I guess it would be better to do strong selenium first to protect shadows, then bleach + thiourea? Then again, strong selenium may leave nothing to bleach out..

    Thanks,

    Max

  5. #5
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I have found that the bleach sepia attacks highlights first
    also selenium attacks the shadows first.
    If you selenium too long first I believe the bleaching and sepia will be less effective, though it may give a look which is appropriate for some taste.

    I always start with the highlights, and I do not go too deep into the midtones, therefore not affecting the shadows, which I then hit with 1:5 selenium to taste.

    different papers will need different times in the bleach and selenium.
    Warmtone less than coldtone papers.
    Quote Originally Posted by MaximusM3 View Post
    Bob,

    Question: if one wants to use thiourea to achieve the same effect, I guess it would be better to do strong selenium first to protect shadows, then bleach + thiourea? Then again, strong selenium may leave nothing to bleach out..

    Thanks,

    Max

  6. #6
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    You can do sepia then selenium, or selenium then sepia. The advantage of sepia first as has been said is you can see the progress as you go. Dilute your bleach up to 10% full strength and pull the print when you see the first signs of highlights bleaching back. After sepia go with selenium for a short time at a rather strong strength, 1:3 to 1:10. The problem I see sometimes is that once in the selenium the sepia toned print moves very quickly to a very very warm brown. If you're going to keep things subtle your times need to be short, no more than a minute if you want to retain any sense of a split tone.

    I've been experimenting more doing selenium first then sepia. The advantages of this is that the print doesn't run away on you going too warm. Selenium toning for 1-2 minutes at 1:10, then make sure you wash completely! Then sepia tone as normal. i find this produces a more true split tone, but much more subtle and less warm than sepia then selenium. The fun is in experimenting. So get to it!

  7. #7

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    Thanks for all the replies!

    Any input on starting with a warmtone paper, like Ilfords MCFB Warmtone? Skip sepia and go straight to selenium?

  8. #8
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteZ8 View Post
    Thanks for all the replies!

    Any input on starting with a warmtone paper, like Ilfords MCFB Warmtone? Skip sepia and go straight to selenium?
    I work with MGWT extensively. I'm not sure what exactly you're asking.

  9. #9

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    I'm saying with a warmtone paper, since it will already have a brownish tint, is there still a need to sepia tone or can I just selenium tone for the shadows? Forgive me my darkroom has been in a box for the last 1 1/2 years and I'm just now getting back into real printing. I can't really remember how "warm" the warmtone is straight out of the fixer.

    Thanks!

  10. #10
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    MGWT has a slightly cream base, not as creamy as most warmtone papers, something I like. The image color itself is dependent upon developer of course, but most would agree that it is rather "greenish" un-toned. And although there are those that may prefer MGWT un-toned, most, like me believe it shines with atleast a treatment in selenium. If you're going for the look like your image above you'll absolutely want to sepia and selenium tone. Selenium toning alone is very nice and will produce purplish shadows but your highlights will still be un-toned.

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