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  1. #31
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    Steve,

    could one say that you have a fixation to americanisms?
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  2. #32
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Could the "darkening" actually be due to the image clearing? By that I mean the shadows becoming "unveiled" as the unexposed and undeveloped silver salts are converted by the fixer into soluble and transparent silver complexes.
    I'd agree. This does happen and is more noticeable with some papers than others.

    Actually when this doesn't occur it's a tell-tale sign the fixers exhausting.

    Ian

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    I'd agree. This does happen and is more noticeable with some papers than others.
    I think I saw that happen a few weeks ago. In fact, I thought I was imagining it!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  4. #34
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Usually, it is the Sodium Chloride in your sweat!

    That is why you should NOT touch unprocessed film or paper. Although it is more evident with papers.

    PE
    One of the main reasons I teach newbies to use tongs on prints up to 8x10 and gloves for larger sizes. Nothing more disgusting than fingerprints on an otherwise perfect print.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  5. #35
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    I think the issue here involves three factors:

    1. Development time is short - and the prints may not be fully developed in two minutes. Prints should be developed to completion - and that may take 3-5 minutes. It may be necessary to shorten the exposure as the development time is increased.

    2. Unexposed and undeveloped silver is removed by the fixer. This is called 'clearing' and visually, the print appears to be slightly darker (and sharper).

    3. OP is trying to evaluate the prints under safelight. That's always a problem. The proper way to evaluate prints is to process to completion, and then turn on the white light for evaluation.
    Louie

  6. #36
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monophoto View Post
    I think the issue here involves three factors:

    1. Development time is short - and the prints may not be fully developed in two minutes. Prints should be developed to completion - and that may take 3-5 minutes. It may be necessary to shorten the exposure as the development time is increased.
    No prints like films are not developed to completion, and the development time can be varied with certain papers (warm tone) to achieve different tones/colours.

    With Bromide papers there is a minimum time to achieve a good D-max that's usually 2 minutes at 20°C but would be shorter at higher temperatures.

    Over development leeds to base fogging and poorer tonality.

    Ian

  7. #37
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    Prints are not developed to "completion", but to optimum tonality. Completion would be to total blackness. Development times are determined by several factors. Temperture, dilution, and the paper emulsion itself to name a few. Some developers such as Ethol LPD are not affected by dilution, which affects tone, but is affected by temperture. Finding the optimum developing time, exposure time, and temperture control combined with subjective personal preference makes for the perfect print. Arresting development immediatly is an aid to locking the final outcome in place, and (IMO)is best accomplished with an acid stop bath. This allows the fixer to perform its function unhindered, also prolonging the life of the fixer. The Type of paper, whether FB or RC, determines the times required in each solution. Once the optimum time in developer is determined, time in stop is either short(10-30 secs for RC) or long(30-60 secs for FB), followed by a proper fix, preferrably a two bath set-up for FB paper, splitting time equally between first and second bath. One other step that is oft times overlooked is a proper drain time between solutions, 5-10 seconds should be sufficient.

    What I have described is basic darkroom print developing 101. Following a proper step-by-step workflow assures that there are no mishaps, and if something should arise, it will be easy to identify where the problem occures from.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick A View Post
    Prints are not developed to "completion", but to optimum tonality. Completion would be to total blackness.
    Whilst this is technically true, in reality, development gets to a point where it slows down considerably such that you would not perceive any change if you let it continue sitting in the developer for as long as it ha already been in it.

    For all intents and purposes, it can be considered to be to completion.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  9. #39
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Whilst this is technically true, in reality, development gets to a point where it slows down considerably such that you would not perceive any change if you let it continue sitting in the developer for as long as it ha already been in it.

    For all intents and purposes, it can be considered to be to completion.


    Steve.
    By that time Steve you've gone well past the optimum development time.

    Ian

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick A View Post
    One of the main reasons I teach newbies to use tongs on prints up to 8x10 and gloves for larger sizes. Nothing more disgusting than fingerprints on an otherwise perfect print.
    Not disagreeing Rick but you do need to be careful with tongs as well.
    I recently kinked the RC paper on a keeper and I know it can happen with Fibre just as bad.

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