Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,549   Posts: 1,544,612   Online: 690
      
Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567
Results 61 to 66 of 66
  1. #61
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,289
    Images
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by winger View Post
    Everything that touches a chemical gets labeled and only used for that chemical. I might be borderline OCD in how I handle chemicals and tools, but part of that's from working in a lab for 14 years. There, I could grab anything I needed without looking 'cause everything was always in exactly the same spot. I'm not quite that bad in my darkroom. Well, maybe close sometimes.
    And I've broken more plastic ones than bamboo, too.
    There is one exception to this. If you do both lith printing and use standard developers, you can actually contaminate your lith developer by using the same tongs as for regular chemistry. Lith printing used to drive me nuts until I started to thoroughly scrub my developer tray after using regular chemistry.

    I have these stainless steel tongs that have tips about an inch wide. On the tip is a square inch big rubber material that firmly grabs the corner of a piece of paper, and holds even a sheet of 16x20 paper without any trouble at all. No kinks either.

    Back to the OP. You've been advised many things in this thread. To summarize:

    1. It doesn't really matter how long you develop your print for, as long as you find what gives the results you like best, and that it's repeatable.
    2. Either use running water as stop bath, or better yet an acid stop bath. Agitate. This insures that the developer is neutralized before it goes into the fixer, which would cause problems.
    3. Different papers react differently in the fixer, and I have noticed that warmtone papers react by darkening more than neutral tone or cold tone papers. They do in fact seem to darken, or I should say have a boost in contrast, as the unexposed and undeveloped silver is cleared by the fixer.

    Good luck. I think you stand a very good chance of easily solving your problems. If you want your prints to last, it is important to neutralize the developer before it goes into the fix, and it's also important to make sure you get all of the fixer out of the print before it's dried. Usually something like a 30 minute was under running water is necessary. Some prefer to use hypo clearing agent to shorten the wash time. I have my washer going for an hour after I'm done with my printing session.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #62
    winger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Page County, IA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,419
    Images
    47
    There is one exception to this. If you do both lith printing and use standard developers, you can actually contaminate your lith developer by using the same tongs as for regular chemistry. Lith printing used to drive me nuts until I started to thoroughly scrub my developer tray after using regular chemistry.
    Thanks for the tip! I will likely try lith at some point (especially after seeing all the great examples in the gallery). Trays seem to have bred in my darkroom, so it shouldn't be a problem (I KNOW I didn't buy more than 3 8x10 trays, yet there are now 8).

  3. #63
    cjbecker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    IN
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    740
    Images
    19
    Thank you everybody, I am now using a stop bath. Everything Thomas said was correct. Everything is going smooth again. I am also trying PF Liquidol, Im really liking it.

  4. #64
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,289
    Images
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by winger View Post
    Thanks for the tip! I will likely try lith at some point (especially after seeing all the great examples in the gallery). Trays seem to have bred in my darkroom, so it shouldn't be a problem (I KNOW I didn't buy more than 3 8x10 trays, yet there are now 8).
    I have some 40"x60" trays in my darkroom. If we could get them to breed I could make some serious bucks. What's your trick, Bethe?
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #65
    winger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Page County, IA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,419
    Images
    47
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    I have some 40"x60" trays in my darkroom. If we could get them to breed I could make some serious bucks. What's your trick, Bethe?
    It never happens when I'm watching or with things I wish would breed. Though the 8x10 trays are useful for other craft projects (paper marbling).

  6. #66

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    984
    I have changed from water rinse after developing paper to a mild solution of sodium metabisulphite which is probably more compatible with alkaline/neutral fixers than the usual acetic acid. I use a Nova vertical slot processor that is designed for running water in slot 2 (the old "Chrome" model) but I found that it does take quite a bit of rinsing to ensure that the prints will be free of stains. I have blocked off the drain to that slot so I can fill it with my stop bath. If using FB paper you can't rush it.

Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin