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  1. #11
    ulysses's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    Take a piece of film leader and fix in room light. Time how long it takes to clear. Then fix the film for twice that long.
    This is what I have done for many years. Recently I developed 3 rolls of Freestyle's Arista Premium 100 (widely believed to be Plus-X). The leader clips cleared in 2 min, but the film in the tank did not clear completely in 6 (I knew I was getting toward the end of this liter of fixer and extended the fix time from my usual 4-5 min.) This was Ilford Hypam, which I've just recently started using. I had been looking for a good rapid fixer to replace Kodafix or Kodak Rapid Fixer, both of which sulfate too quickly, hence the change to Hypam, which otherwise has been satisfactory. The lesson for me is to start keeping track of the rolls I process in a batch of fixer, and toss it before "clear the leader" test would indicate. Live and learn. For the record, I just mixed up a fresh liter of Hypam and re-fixed the offending rolls, which now look fine.

    Ulysses

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ulysses View Post
    The leader clips cleared in 2 min, but the film in the tank did not clear completely in 6 (I knew I was getting toward the end of this liter of fixer and extended the fix time from my usual 4-5 min.)
    Ulysses
    When ever a pour fixer back in the bottle, I grab a 1 oz measures worth and put in two drops of "hypo-check" if I see any cloudiness, I repeat the fixing with fresh fixer and also replece the bottle of working solution. (actually I mix a mew batch and use it to re-fix the film that is still in the tank).

    One of the reasons I tend not to use the "t" series films is that they seem to take twice as long to fix, - when I do use them I often will start with fresh fixer.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  3. #13
    ulysses's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmacd123 View Post
    One of the reasons I tend not to use the "t" series films is that they seem to take twice as long to fix, - when I do use them I often will start with fresh fixer.
    Agreed, but oddly enough, I hadn't processed and T-grain films with this fixer. I mostly shoot HP5+ and Arista Premium 100 (Plus-X) these days. It would appear that the fixer reached something like exhaustion during the processing of the three rolls in question. I doubt anything would have detected that. According to Ilford the capacity of Hypam is 24 rolls (120 or 135-36) per liter. It's likely that I was quite near that. In the future, I'll keep better track. I may also start using a stop bath, which I don't normally do with film.

    Ulysses

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Looks like it might be bromide drag around those sprocket holes. This can be too much or too little agitation. If it is bromide drag in the developer, then you cannot fix the problem.

    PE
    Probably right. But when I've seen streaks from the sprocket holes before (I've produced the a few times), they have been dark. These are light.

  5. #15
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    Bromie inhibits development. Thus when it "drags" across the film it causes light streaks in the negative and dark streaks in the print. This is what I see here and that is why I suggested bromde drag.

    PE

  6. #16

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    Makes sense. Dark streaks could be caused by locally increased agitation.

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