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  1. #11

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    I don't understand, your cold water temp is 85°F? Where are you drawing water from, a pond?

    .
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  2. #12

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    hi ezwriter

    i lived in a sweat lodge of a factory building for years. it was a brick kiln, black membrane roof just above my head, and
    a vented skylight so all the building's hot air vented through my space ... it was fun

    vpwphoto makes a great point, to have a bunch of water just in buckets at ambient room temp. ...
    but if your ambient temp is kind of high ( summers mine was between 80-90º, and cold water was between 70-80ºF ) it will only do half the job

    ... if you store water to mix your chemistry in your fridge, that will help ...

    small hand-tanks don't take a lot of water to wash, especially with fixer remover ... you should easily be able to
    do a final wash with a a supply of 2.5 or 5 gallon buckets to do your final wash ( and it doesn't really matter if your wash water isn't 68º ) ...

    for developer, fix, stop, fix remover, you can mix fresh with water you have stored in the little fridge ...
    and if it is too cold you can mix it with your gallons in the buckets or with warmer water from your spigot

    if you find your film developing to be too short + uneven negatives ( below 5-6min? ) ... you might also thinkabout developers with glycin in them like to be used at around 72-73ºF ( lots of formulas out there, and the photographer's formulary sells + makes glycin )
    and also look around for formulas for "tropical developers" ... they also like hot temperatures ... the formulary sells the chemistry to
    make them ..

    making developer from component chemicals is pretty much the same as mixing a dry packet of your D76, except you mix
    4 or 5 things together, instead of 1 ...

    have fun ( and good luck) !
    john
    Last edited by jnanian; 10-24-2011 at 09:51 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    ask me how ..

  3. #13
    Robert Hall's Avatar
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    Ice
    Robert Hall
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    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

  4. #14
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    For me, when my tap water is too warm, i use frozen plastic soda bottles to cool the develper. I place my developer container (brown glass) in a water-filled bucket and add the frozen soda bottle. I check the temp of the developer until it reaches the desired temp and remove it.

  5. #15
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    I've settled on 75F as a working temp because that's the coldest I get out of my taps in the summer, and it's not hard to maintain with my Jobo in the winter. I don't like dealing with hauling ice up and down the stairs from the kitchen to the darkroom and then playing around with adding ice, checking the temp, adding hot water when I've over-cooled it, then adding more ice to bring it back down again. That said, 85 is pretty darned hot out of the tap. I'd third/fourth/fifth(?) the recommendation of mixing up a large volume of water that you pre-temper and then use it to dilute your chems and process your film. The plastic bottle full of ice is a good idea for managing a big bucket or a bathtub full of water.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick A View Post
    My suggestion is to temper a couple of gallons of water. Keep two or more one gallon jugs of tap water in the fridge, and then bring it up to temp as needed. It is easy to mix some warmer water to obtain temp needed. Some folks think that only developer temp is critical, that's true to a point, but keeping all chems at or near(+-1 deg)is important to avoid reticulation of the emulsion. Some films are more sensitive to temp changes than others, so I err on the safe side and temper all my liquids the same.
    A. In thousands of rolls of film I have never had any problem with wash water or stop water being a different temp than developer. Nor have I ever checked the temp on wash or stop other than to see that it was not hot.

    B. Toss a few ice cubes in a ziplock bag and use that to lower your developer temp.

    C. Use Diafine, or some other developer that is either temperature independent or that is a higher temp developer with a development curve that goes through your normal water temps.

    D. Just use bottled water.
    * Just because your eyes are closed, doesn't mean the lights in the darkroom are off. *
    * When the film you put in the camera is worth more than the camera you put the film in... *
    * When I started using 8x10, it amazed me how many shots were close to the car. *

  7. #17

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    I too use 75 as that covers the summer range and is easy to maintain in the winter. My summer cold water runs a pretty steady 71 to 73 degrees.

    Mike

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    75 should not be a problem with standard materials unless it results in development times which are shorter than say 5 minutes. In fact 75 was (or still is) Kodak's recommended temp for TMax/Tmax RS.
    IIRC, a few years ago Kodak adopted 75 F as their standard temperature for all their BW films. Some european films still require a lower processing temperature.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 10-24-2011 at 04:27 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  9. #19

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    Entirely possible. It has been quite a while since I've looked at their processing tables. If I was starting over 75 would actually be a little easier for me to work with in the mid-summer months. For now I'm too stuck in my old 68F ways to bother changing.

  10. #20
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    @ chistopher... if that works for you great. Temp increase of as little as 2 degree either way shows up in density!
    You may not need a water bath, unless you are developing film in a jungle or ice hotel, but it is very prudent to know your "starting point" at the very least.
    Cheers.

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