Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,452   Posts: 1,570,238   Online: 1126
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 36
  1. #21
    vpwphoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,115
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    7
    @ Paul Ron

    Come on... he lives in an apartment building the thermal inertia of the building could very well be what he says. Don't bust the OP's chops just to sound smart. I explained that in Aruba, even in a nice hotel the "cold" water was never below 90 degrees F!!

    He might be on the 10th floor of a building where the pipes run with the heating pipes or on the south wall who knows, but he came to us with a legitimate question, that I am sure is experienced by more than him alone.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    FL, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    581
    Where I live the cold city water is about 26c in The summer and even in winter it comes out about 22-23c. I live in a house. When you live this far south that's what you get.

    I just mix up my developer at whatever temp the water is and adjust the time. I then stop with tap water and fix with fixer that is ambient room temp then finally wash with tap water.

    It works for me as I am too lazy to try cool things down and keep them there.

  3. #23
    Maris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Noosa, Queensland, Australia.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    744
    Phooey to 68 F!

    That's a historic relic derived from European tap water temperature being the basis for processing photographic materials. Here in Australia my tap water rarely runs that low and I reckon it doesn't matter. The important thing is that all processing solutions including the tap-water wash be the SAME temperature to avoid thermal shock to the wet emulsion.

    My approach is to develop at tap water temperature and adjust the developing time. For (replenished) Xtol my time/temperature experiments indicate for Tmax 100 at 55 Farenheit 23 minutes is right while at 95 Farenheit 2 minutes 40 seconds does the same thing. For temperatures in between my time adjustments fall in an orderly way. Other films behave in a parallel manner and a few initial trials tell you what you need to know.

    The anxiety about too short developing times leading to uneven results is overstated. With a properly pre-wet film in a Paterson (or similar) developing tank and a ready-to-hand jug of developer and the willingness to pour and agitate quickly a 3 minute developing time is no problem at all.

    There are supposed to be "soft emulsion" films out there but I've never had Efke, Adox, Foma, Ilford, Fuji, or Kodak misbehave at any temperture. I figure if the only things touching the emulsion are air plus liquid for a short time what's going to wreak damage. It's worth remembering that film washes quicker when it is hot. A 4 minute flowing wash at 90 F is as good as a 10 minute flowing wash at 68 F.

    For the record my hottest development was in the Australian outback using artesian bore water that came out of the ground at 113 F. The Tmax 100 negatives were fine with a hint of sepia from the sulphur that was in the water too. If you work quickly and carefully film can be processed safely at surprisingly elevated temperatures.
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

  4. #24
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,467
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    437
    The one big downside to processing at elevated temperatures and abbreviated times is the loss of precision in control. Working at high temperatures is fine and dandy if you are aiming for "printable" negatives. If your goal is to do N+1 or N-1 development and your base time is 3 minutes (180 seconds) then your N+/- factor is a mere 18 seconds, which is within the margin for error of pouring your solutions in and out of the developing tank.

  5. #25
    vpwphoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,115
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    7
    Word...Flying Camera!
    And uniformity is in the eye of the beholder.
    I respect what people have to do to do what they have to or wish to!
    Thanks for the update about where 68° comes from Mr Maris.... I hope to visit your land someday.. 113° well tap!!! ouch.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Iowa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    30
    I never use water from a faucet for my film processing. I always have a few gallons of distilled or purified water sitting on my kitchen counter, along with my developer, stop bath, fixer and HCA. I keep the temperature in the room at around 68 degrees, and after I mix the D-76 1:1 with water, and it's at the right temp, I start the process. I use the distilled water for the wash, and everything should be close to 68 F.

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    7
    You need a standard to keep things consistant. I live in Central Texas where the summers are very hot. Tap water is way above 68 (F) this time of year. As mentioned above I keep a jug of water in the fridge and pour some into my gallon of "to be" 68 water along with the warmer tap water. a bit of adjustment here or there and I have my 68 degree water, All my Chems are mixed and all my rinsing is done from that jug.

  8. #28
    rmolson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Mansfield Ohio
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    307

    watter temperature

    Wash water temp


    I have used a clear plastic shoe storage box for my water for years It holds about 3 gallons I would guess I use only one shot so it relatively easy to adjust the temperature. The fix temp is adjusted first heating it or cooling it to what ever the tap water is If the tap temperature is too high ice is added until I get to a working range 68 to 72 much higher creates problem of very short developing times. The wash is from the tempered water in the box using the Ilfords dump and fill It not only conserves water it reduces chances of temperature fluctuations. There is enough water generally to handle a reel tank and have a little left over to rise the reels and tank I learned long ago that while film emulsions are tough the best results are when all the solutions are the same temperature. There is a condition of reticulation that is so fine it is confused with grain

  9. #29
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,344
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    IIRC, a few years ago Kodak adopted 75 F as their standard temperature for all their BW films. Some european films still require a lower processing temperature.
    No mention of that in the PDF on Tri-x from 2007. In fact in that document the "small tank" H&D curves are shown for 20C.

  10. #30
    Maris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Noosa, Queensland, Australia.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    744
    Quote Originally Posted by vpwphoto View Post
    Thanks for the update about where 68° comes from Mr Maris.... I hope to visit your land someday.. 113° well tap!!! ouch.
    There are limits! I delivered a photography course in Blackall, Queensland where the town water supply runs at 136 F. People don't heat water, that's free, but they run half of it through 500yards of plastic pipe in the shade under their houses to get a flow for the "cold" tap and to keep young children safe from scalding.

    As for photographic processing, I used buckets of water (drawn the day before) that had settled to a workable 90 F.
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin