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  1. #11
    Blighty's Avatar
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    I have no running water in my darkroom so I have to pelt down stairs carrying the print in a tray and lobit in the wash. It does keep you quite fit however.
    Norman is an island.Time and tide wait for Norman.

  2. #12
    pinhole_dreamer's Avatar
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    I'm working with a dry darkroom. After the developer and fix, I end up putting the photo face up, on a sheet of paper towel...and then run it upstairs to the bathroom and sometimes, kitchen sink where I keep my wash tub. I use one of those heavy duty plastic ones from a dollar store. So far, so good.
    I love the smell of fixer in the morning...It smells like...PHOTOGRAPHY!

    The photo blog has moved...
    I Love Film : by Susan McNutt, the mad photographer

  3. #13
    Rick A's Avatar
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    You needn't be in a rush to wash prints after fixing. Placing them in a holding tray or bin with fresh water until finished with a session works well. If you are printing RC paper, then you may not want to keep them soaking for longer than 15-20 minutes as they might start to delaminate. RC paper usually needs only a 2-3 minute wash in running water, or the equivalent using fill and drain every 30 seconds(4-6 fills) using cold water, not hot. Fiber paper requires much longer washing times, that can be reduced with a two minute soak in a hypo clearing solution. Kodak recommends a water flow rate the equivalent of 12 complete changes of water per hour for washing. This works out to a fill and drain every five minutes.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  4. #14
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post

    For washing I do much what others do but have an additional challenge in that I don't have a sink anywhere in the house large enough for an 8x10 much less 11x14 tray. I suppose I could use the bathtub but that's low and very awkward.
    If you have a bathtub with a flat topped rim, an inexpensive wire shelf laid on top can solve this problem:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails wash trays.jpg  
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #15
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    If you have a bathtub with a flat topped rim, an inexpensive wire shelf laid on top can solve this problem:
    Good suggestion but it doesn't really work with the garden tub in my master bath, I think. It's not that it isn't flat topped, rather that the front of it has a step and is too wide - it's a LONG reach back to the water unless you are in the tub. The "normal" tub in the guest bath would work, but my fiance has pretty well commandeered that bath room. I'll get running water in the basement within a year, I hope.

    The other comment about RC papers de-laminating with long soak times is valid, plus if you print RC glossy (which I don't, preferring pearl and similar) the finish tends to dull with excess wet times. For RC paper I just rinse quickly in the holding bath then squeegee off and lay on a towel or similar. It won't hurt them to dry then wash later in a batch.

  6. #16

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    About stains: most of your chemicals won't stain, but two things to watch out for: undiluted Kodak stop bath (as well as a couple of other brands) is pretty strong acid, and will do worse than stain--it'll eat up porcelain pretty good. And Selenium toner stains like crazy, so watch it if you're toning; you need to rinse any of those splashes right away.

  7. #17

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    Two trays is the most water efficient way and can be done in the kitchen.

    interleave prints in one tray while filling a second . Move the prints to new tray one at a time draining a each before transfer. Refill first tray while interleaving prints in second. Use 4 trays for RC, 8 for fiber.

    This works well because you use fresh water rather than diluting old water. Stains from wash water are not a problem. Developer is removed/neutralised by SS and/or fix.

  8. #18

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    I too just set up a darkroom in my apt. I cut a plywood board, with slats UNDERNEATH otherwise the whole thing falls in the tub! ;>
    8x10 trays fit nice on it. 11 by 14 u have to put two sideways. Drill holes in it so the water runs out the spigot side. and put doorstops under the wash tray so water runs to the left.
    I keep rinsing down the tub as i'm working but any stains u can wipe off. Develper will be brown found out this am.
    I cut a plastic hose over the spigot and put hole in it so a big droom thermometer stays there.

    Even w/ the fan on it gets hot in there tho. wow. Wear a bandana!

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    If you have a bathtub with a flat topped rim, an inexpensive wire shelf laid on top can solve this problem:
    Love the clock on the wall
    Bob Walberg

    The fix is in!

  10. #20
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by walbergb View Post
    Love the clock on the wall
    Only possible because of the magic of battery operated clocks, suction cup hooks (and $1.00 thrift store finds).

    A word to the wise - black second hands are good for darkrooms with safelights - red second hands not so good
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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