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  1. #11

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    Thanks again all I am going to try this technique on a few other papers this week. I have foma, oriental WT, and Varitone WT we shall see. I was hoping Ilford would work for me in this regard. Perhaps I will give it another try.

    Thanks again

  2. #12
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Warmtone papers in general behave much like the Ilford in that the shadows turn warm in selenium, especially if you use sepia first and then selenium.

    The suggestion is to try it with a paper that isn't warm toned.

    Good luck!
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #13

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    Thanks again all and Thomas,

    I tried a set of prints using Arista edu amd Adox MCC with fotospeed sepia toner. Got the split I was going for. Now just need to dial in what shade of Sepia will look best. My highlights have a sort of pink hue which I have not decided if I like or not.

  4. #14
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by padraigm View Post
    Thanks again all and Thomas,

    I tried a set of prints using Arista edu amd Adox MCC with fotospeed sepia toner. Got the split I was going for. Now just need to dial in what shade of Sepia will look best. My highlights have a sort of pink hue which I have not decided if I like or not.
    Yep, it becomes important to play with different dilutions of the bleach in order to get the amount of toning you want in the highlights.

    The brighter your highlights are in the print, the quicker the bleaching process will go. If you ever print a dark picture, then you'll end up needing to bleach longer or in more concentrated bleach. But you'll learn that as you go along.

    Glad to hear of your progress!
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

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