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  1. #11
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Also check that the enlarging lens is clean - look up through the lens with the enlarger on and no negative in the carrier. If the lens looks dusty, foggy or moldy then this is a contributing factor to your 'blah' prints.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  2. #12

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    It is importanr to develop prints fully using the manufacturer's recommended time. Avoid pulling prints too soon as this prevents good placks and leads to grey muddy looking prints.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #13

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    Perhaps the obvious question, are you using any fixer?! You didn't mention anything in your original post. Most likely though, the paper is a bit untrustworthy. If the various safelight, temperature and fogging checks suggested by others are producing the same unpleasant results as the printing, then it is time to find some new paper. Good luck - this is just a starting glitch, it's really a 'simple' process once you get going.

  4. #14
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Sounds like you're doing everything correctly, except:

    1. Your paper is old.

    Try getting a fresh pack of paper, and continue using fresh paper until you feel comfortable with printing.
    Using dated paper is the best source of confusion there is when you start printing.

    Reminders:
    a. Develop your prints for as long as it says on the developer package.
    b. Keep chemistry at room temperature, above 18*C/65*F for best results.
    c. Agitate continuously for the first 30 seconds and make sure the print is fully submerged. Then rock the tray every 15 seconds or so by tipping up one of the corners.
    d. Stop bath for however long it says on the container. It's a good idea to agitate continuously. Indicator stop bath is great, because it changes color when it's exhausted.
    e. Fixer for however long it says on the container. It's not a bad idea to agitate continuously. Always make sure your fixer isn't exhausted.
    f. Wash your prints carefully. This is important. Or you will have yellow and contaminated prints a couple of years down the road.

    Good luck, and have fun!

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

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