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  1. #1
    /dev/null's Avatar
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    Some Kodak T-MAX100 - 120 help

    I'm an analog newbie and the weekend I am going to shoot some landscapes, trees and stuff with the T-MAX100. Probably a bit of cloudy weather. I am looking for contrast rich results and did some reading on development, so probably will do it in Rodinal.

    Any thoughts on the preffered ISO setting for this film? Like they say the Ilford 3200 goes on 1600 for instance. I just measure ISO100? Thanks.

  2. #2

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    If you're new to film and processing, I'd experiment some first. Exposing Tmax-100 at an E.I. of 100 is a good starting point. As for developers, Rodinal is OK too. If you want to impact contrast, you can do that in the development process by extending the development time 10% - 20%. Shoot a roll and see what happens.

    Jim B.

  3. #3
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    If you haven't used a combo, any combo, the best place to start IMO is with the box rating and normal development. You can adjust contrast when you print.

    Printing is the real test, adjusting the negative's contrast really only makes sense when you are trying to make your printing easier.

    One of the big mistakes I made when coming back to film was trying to make pretty "contrasty" negatives, because I wasn't printing yet and I wanted something to look good.

    Yes, those early B&W negatives are "prettier" to look at directly but they are really much tougher to print. In contrast to that my early C-41 negatives, which were developed "by the book" are quite easy to print. My current B&W negs which are now generally shot and developed pretty much "by the book" print much, much easier.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #4

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    To start, get yourself some D76. Rate the film at 100 and develop it in D76 diluted 1:1 with water as per Kodak's time/temperature/agitation recommendations. Start there. Ideally you'd do a few test rolls for practice and to fine tune things.

    Evaluate your negatives by printing them, not by visual inspection of the negatives. It is difficult to evaluate a negative by visual inspection, particularly if you're new to this.
    Last edited by Michael R 1974; 11-03-2011 at 09:01 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Removed reference to Rodinal - don't want to anger the Rodinal army.

  5. #5
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Start with the basics. As Mark states, shoot it at box speed. Developing is a different story. There are many good developers, Rodinal is one, Kodak D-76(or any cloned D-76) will do well. Follow the recommended developing time for the film. Don't concern yourself with experimenting or choosing someone elses time/combo for now, stick with basics until you are comfortable shooting and processing.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  6. #6
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    To start, get yourself some D76, not Rodinal. Rate the film at 100 and develop it in D76 diluted 1:1 with water as per Kodak's time/temperature/agitation recommendations. Start there. Ideally you'd do a few test rolls for practice and to fine tune things. Evaluate your negatives by printing them, not by visual inspection of the negatives. It is difficult to evaluate a negative by visual inspection, particularly if you're new to this.
    +1

    Here's the Kodak tech pub.

    Actually any developer listed in this document would do fine. The info here if followed carefully will get you negatives that are easily printable. When you get this well practiced and know how you want to change your prints then you can refine your process in a meaningful direction.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #7
    /dev/null's Avatar
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    Yes, I will shoot some rolls and test with several ISO settings, just to make sure there is nothing 'special' about this film like 'has to be at ISO 50' or so.

    I don't print, but will scan the negatives. But like to have a bit of contrasty negative before...

  8. #8
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mackinaw View Post
    If you're new to film and processing, I'd experiment some first. Exposing Tmax-100 at an E.I. of 100 is a good starting point. As for developers, Rodinal is OK too. If you want to impact contrast, you can do that in the development process by extending the development time 10% - 20%. Shoot a roll and see what happens.

    Jim B.
    Exactly what he said.
    "Never criticize someone until you've walked a mile in their shoes. That way, you're a mile away and you've got their shoes."

    MY BLOG - www.reservedatalltimes.com
    YOU SHOULD LOOK AT THIS SITE - www.colincorneau.com
    INSTAGRAM: colincorneau

  9. #9

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    Just stick with the basics and have fun!

    Jeff

  10. #10

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    Good Morning, /dev/null,

    Box rating, Kodak T-Max developer 1:7, 10 minutes as a starting point should give excellent results.

    Konical

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