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  1. #31
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I finished my last 100 foot roll of Kodak film so now I have a chance to try out the ORWO N75 Plus 400 film.
    This is from the first roll. Developed for 8 min 24 deg. C in Tmax developer, rotary. Printed on Ilford FB MG.

  2. #32
    gorbas's Avatar
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    Nice work IC-racer! For sure it's very challenging subject for lighting. Did you use available light or you did full lighting setup? So far i like ORWO N74 way more than slower UN-54
    All the best
    Goran

  3. #33
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Thanks for the comments. That is the roof of a cave. It is right at the opening, so it is illuminated with the available light.

  4. #34
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    Here's a couple of N74 on my blog http://boxesbellows.blogspot.com/2012/01/orwo-n74.html

  5. #35
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I shot the last of 200 feet of this film this week. Time for some more.

  6. #36

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    I'm not sure how to read the charts about film speed.

    I'm a total film noob, still working my way through my first 100foot can of Tri-X. I'll be living in Europe this summer, and Tri-X is getting damn expensive, so I'm interested in using N74 instead.

    I hear large format photographers say that Tri-X "true speed" is around 250 ISO. I guess that's based on Zone system and where the shadow detail should be on the... curve... obviously I have no idea what I'm talking about. Does that mean that I could shoot N74 at 200 or 250 in daylight and get good results?

    I'm currently shooting Tri-X at 400 and 1600, developed in T-Max dev at my local pro lab. I'm going to start developing at home, and I think I need speeds between ~250 and ~1250 for the range of what I'm doing (mostly snapshots, street photography, candid stuff, in everything from bright sunlight to dimly lit pubs).

    What developer should I start with? D-76 and XTOL are obvious options, as well as HC-110. I like the idea of HC-110 because it's so cheap and easy to use as one shot, but I'm not sure if it will be easy to get my hands on. I know I can get the other two easily, and they are cheap enough of course.

    Any advice for me? Thanks!

  7. #37
    Bundesphotograph's Avatar
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    Official development times from ORWO for rotation development in a small tank :
    Attached Files

  8. #38
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    Try the flickr group http://www.flickr.com/groups/1924424@N22/ . They are quite active in finding developer combinations with examples. I prefer the UN54 (ISO 100) over the N74, but both are quite usable.

    The N74 is probably closer to Kentmere. Both respond favorably to Thornton (easily made and chemicals can be bought from B&H worldwide).

    Here is N74 in Thornton....

    Click image for larger version. 

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    And as a reversal...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The grain is what you would expect and you can get good results with the right choices.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 8836505821_2b97c0d78d_d.jpg  
    Get it right in the camera, the first time...

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