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Thread: Kodak AZO paper

  1. #1

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    Kodak AZO paper

    Hi,

    I have a question I was hoping that someone could help me with.
    I own a box of 11x14 Kodak AZO paper (F-0). The box is in good condition and unopened, holds 144 sheets.
    Can anyone give me an idea what this might be worth? Also how do I tell the age of the paper?

    Thanks for your help!

    Gordon


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  2. #2

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    For someone who has some VERY contrasty 11x14 negatives it COULD be priceless. But as someone who would pay top dollar for a few boxes of 16x20 or 20x24 Rochester Grade 2 Azo, this grade 0 11x14 is worthless to me.

    My best guess on the age of the paper would be from the 40s or 50s.

    My suggestion would be to post it for sale on the Azo forum and see what develops (pun intended).

    Good Luck,
    John Bowen

  3. #3

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    John, thanks for your reply!

    Gordon

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    holmburgers's Avatar
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    The most bewildering thought I'm having is... who would make a box of exactly 144 sheets?

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    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Long ago and far away, people use a measure called a dozen. A dozen dozen was one gross. This is 12 x 12 which equals 144. So, at the time that paper was packed 144 was "normal". From this POV, that package becomes historically important.

    PE

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    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Ahhh!

  7. #7
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    The most bewildering thought I'm having is... who would make a box of exactly 144 sheets?
    If you had 12 fingers, you wouldn't have had to ask
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #8
    tjaded's Avatar
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    So PE...how many millimeters in an Imperial gallon? HA HA. That makes sense though. It's funny how some things change over the years...number of exposures for a 35mm roll for example.
    --------------------
    "Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it." -Paul Strand

    www.glasskeyphoto.com

  9. #9
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    Use it to print negatives that were on modern film bases, old nitrocellulose or even glass plates developerd to high negative densities.
    Old processes called for films to be developed to a higher than current contrast index suited for older historical process, such as cyanotype, argrotype, etc.

    It is not unusual to see old negs developed to maximum densities of 1.8 or even 2.1. To get a full range print you need grade 0, and some burning still.

    The nice thing with grade 0 is that it is much less likely to loose contrast over time, like grade 4 would, although since azo in silver chloride, and not bromide, I am not sure it looses contrast the same way as chlorobromide or bromide papers do.

    It can have fog. You may need to learn to supress it.

    Have fun playing. At worst it would be a great deal of fun doing photograms with, if notheing else.
    my real name, imagine that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    ... A dozen dozen was one gross. This is 12 x 12 which equals 144. So, at the time that paper was packed 144 was "normal".

    If you really want to get confused on old measurement systems get stuck in looking at old English systems for acres, townships, etc. Then throw in barns without realizing that barns was a joke among physicist decades later.

    A barn is microscopic. So you're looking at all these measurements that are the size of wheat fields and there's one that's the cross section of an atom.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

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