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Thread: D-76 at 1:3

  1. #11

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    Trying to save on developer is a foolish economy. Follow Kodak's recommendation as to the minumum amount of developer required. As Ian points out developer that is too dilute will result in flat negatives and a distorted tonal range. Developer is cheap, film is not.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  2. #12

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    'Everybody' says that ID11 and D76 is the same thing. Ilford states 100ml stock vs Kodak 250 ml pr 135/120 film. I guess it is not the same thing?

  3. #13
    nhemann's Avatar
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    Thank you all for the advice and opinions, the collective mind here never fails me. Gerald, I def appreciate what you mean - sorting out the rash of info out there can be a real nightmare and I was asking more out of a waste not, want not mentality than as a penny pincher.
    "There is no such thing as objective reality in a photograph"

    My flickr and (gasp!) dpug photos - take a look if you like.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by mfohl View Post
    So, Michael R, based on your statement of higher sharpness and graininess at 1+3, should I expect slightly higher sharpness and graininess at 1+2 compared to 1+1? Enquiring minds want to know, and might benefit from your experience.

    Tnx,

    -- Mark
    Generally, solvent developers are sharper the more they are diluted. There is a corresponding grain increase. So yes, these effects are what one would observe going from stock strength to increasingly dilute working solutions. Along with the grain and sharpness effects, contrast also generally decreases with dilution: total density range as well as local contrast, particularly in the higher values which will show compression (a gradual shouldering). Note of course these contrast effects can be altered by adjusting development time and agitation, so what I'm giving you are basic directional changes.

    It therefore follows developer dilutions should be adjusted to control working characteristics, not to save money. If you do it properly it doesn't save any money anyhow since best practice is to add more water, not decrease the amount of developer concentrate/stock (if you want high quality, repeatable and consistent results).

  5. #15
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The most economic way to use D76 is as it was designed for in the firtst place - replenished.

    Once seasoned a replenished developer like D76/ID-11 and Xtol etc gives all the benefits of use at about 1+2, the increased sharpness and acutance, a better tonality but in addition it gives finer grain.

    Ian

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