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  1. #11

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    One thing I have noticed lately - not yet proven, is that high dilutions may yield more edge surge effects. Not sure of this yet, but I keep very good records of what I do for each roll of film.

    One other tip - you will waste (in some sense) a roll of film, but if you place the camera on tripod very close to a light colored evenly lit wall (inside the house will work), focus on infinity (not looking for detail here), and place the value of the wall on zone 7 or 8, and fire off all exposures, then develop with your method, then print on grade 3 or higher - but print the value down to maybe zone 5, you will see the surge. A contact sheet is best. You might be shocked. When you can develop a consistent and uniform roll this way, you've got it.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Collier View Post
    place the value of the wall on zone 7 or 8, and fire off all exposures, then develop with your method, then print on grade 3 or higher - but print the value down to maybe zone 5, you will see the surge.
    Still being a little new to this game, I assume if I use the right filter with my variable contrast paper I will get a similar result. Correct?

  3. #13

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    A few general points regarding stand development:

    -Usually more successful with slower films
    -Typically results in less highlight compensation than one might expect
    -Tends to slightly reinforce lower values
    -Can result in exaggerated edge effects

    Note edge effects (adjacency effects) have nothing to do with uneven development and/or surge effects.

  4. #14

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    Michael R - thanks for those comments, they agree with my experiences. I've been doing different stand and semi-stand processing only for the last 5 - 10 years, and I would agree (but didn't realize the slow film thing). Do you know why slow films are more responsive?

    Pioneer - yes, the VC filters will work, it's what I use. The reason for the higher contrast printing is that it will reveal the effects of surge more readily. The reason for placing the value of the surface photographed on a higher zone, when exposing the film, is that the higher values in the neg are more vulnerable to surge (you won't see it in the shadows.) By printing the value down to a mid-tone with enhanced contrast, any surge will be easier to see.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    -Usually more successful with slower films
    -Typically results in less highlight compensation than one might expect
    -Tends to slightly reinforce lower values
    -Can result in exaggerated edge effects
    Thanks for that Michael R. Most of the posts and other information I have read agree that slower films respond better to stand development. But there is not a whole lot of info about stand development with higher speed films, specifically ISO 400 films. I have found a Flikr site where someone has done something similar in 1+200 Rodinal.

    A little background.Most of my developing is done with standard methods using a Jobo daylight tank. I always try to fill the tank whether it is 35, 120 or 4x5 sheet film. In 4x5 I usually use ISO 100 film but, once in a while, I will shoot a sheet or two of ISO 400 4x5 film. This happens so seldom that I can have an exposed sheet or two lying around for months waiting to accumulate enough to make a special run in the Jobo tank. I was reading about stand development the other day and learned that it was useful for developing different types of film. My little brain went "Ding, ding...pay attention here!" Maybe this is a way to develop some of my 400 along with my 100 and 125. Since Rodinal is pretty inexpensive, especially at these solution levels I decided to try it out. I shoot a lot more ISO 400 roll film so I am trying it there first.

    My goal is a printable negative with reasonable contrast and relatively low grain. Since I doubt that I am the only one who has tried this, I thought I would throw the idea up on the forum and see what others have learned. BTW, if it helps, I typically shoot Arista Edu 100 or 400, and slower (ISO 50 & ISO 125) Ilford films.

    Thank you all for your ideas, and I welcome anybody's input on this. I will continue to experiment and will let you know how it works as it progresses.

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