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  1. #1
    kb3lms's Avatar
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    Help Identifying Film

    A few years back I purchased a 35mm bulk loader on the auction site and never used it. Today I finally pulled it out of the box to load some new film only to find out it was almost full of some sort of film already. So I loaded up a cassette with a about 12 frames worth, shot them at ISO 100 and processed in XTOL for 10 min @ 68 F. The film is looks to be quite fogged and has no trace of what I shot on it, so I would guess it is pretty slow. They only edge marking is "EASTMAN 28" and "W.T" or "W.1' " so I'd say that makes it some kind of Kodak film. The second marking is hard to tell because there is a sprocket hole right over it, but the "EASTMAN 28" is quite clear. The back of the unprocessed film is a rose color and the emulsion is a grayish-pink color.

    Any ideas on what this film might be and how to correctly process it? A quick Google search didn't turn up anything. I have no idea how old the film might really be, but I bought the loader 6 or 7 years ago.

  2. #2

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    Since it is marked Eastman it is a motion picture film. Standard Eastman 35 mm films are marked 52XX where XX can be any number, 00 to 99. There may also be a symbol indicating the year of manufacture. For example, 5222 is Eastman Double-X, a fast film. Kodak's website has a list of Eastman films and their numbers. Newer films also have a barcode describing the film. Since your film doesn't use this convention it may be a special order film or perhaps a film not intended for camera use.

    You can also distinguish between still and MP film by the shape of the sprocket holes, Still films have holes that are retangular with rounded corners. MP films have the two short sides shaped like arcs

    Since you got no image but the edge markings are easily discernable indicates that the film must be very slow. Since it appears badly fogged why bother with what it is. Just chuck it and use the loader for something else.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 12-09-2011 at 11:06 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

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  3. #3

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    The older movie films didn't always have the type on them. 28 is probably the slit number of the master roll. There are probably some additional markings that are just symbols, but they can be decoded into the year of manufacture via charts like this:

    http://www.film-center.com/dates.html

    The only red films I've seen are reversal films like 5360/2360 and SO-291. Those are not only incredibly slow (ISO 0.25 or so?) but you have to develop the living crap out of them. My latest attempts were with ID-11 stock solution for 13 minutes, which came out OK. So your film may not be fogged, just underdeveloped.

    Duncan

  4. #4
    kb3lms's Avatar
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    Thanks for the input. Late last night I did find the film center link as well. It doesn't appear to be any great find so I took it out of the loader and replaced it with the roll of Legacy Pro 100 I was intending to use in the first place. The mystery film is in a can in the refrigerator for the moment so if anyone can suggest any use for it.... Otherwise it's going out next time I'm in there.

    Now if I could just find the box of re-loadable ISO 100 cassettes I bought.

  5. #5
    kb3lms's Avatar
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    Came up with the best use for this stuff of all. Strip the emulsion off with bleach. Now I have clear 35mm acetate film base!

  6. #6
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    Older 35mm eastman MP film sometimes had an inked footage number every 18 inches, the first letter of that number indicated the film type. 12 frames may not show the number. Later film has it as a latent image, also every 18 inches (1 Second for a movie) The latest film has a bar code with a string of digits, the first two letters indicated the type (for Kodak it would be Kx or Ex) but those don't have the strip numbers ie (Eastman 27 S'afety Film)
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  7. #7
    cmacd123's Avatar
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    I also should mention that Movie negative will almost always have Bell and Howell perforations, they are rounded at the ends, Most still film has Kodak Standard perforations wiich have rounded corners and straight sides on all four sides. That can help separate out some industrial or special purpose film.

    The Bell and Howel perfs actually have a sharp corner where the end meets the sides, which makes the film slightly weaker, but the rest of the design works better in movie printing equipment.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

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    Movie negative films with have the B&H perforations with the rounded ends. But the print films have the rectangular perforations.



 

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