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  1. #1
    Helinophoto's Avatar
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    Come on you curly (/&% Tri-X film

    Hi

    So I am currently stuck in the bathroom with a film that just WILL NOT spool ok on my paterson spool.

    Film is Tri-x 320, was just outside and shot a roll, took it out of my Hasselblad and went to develop it.
    The film is absolutely impossible to deal with, curls like crazy, never experienced it that bad before.


    IT's so bad, that when I have gotten it entered on the spool and start chugging it on there, it starts to slip because of the inzane curl and the whole film just bounces up on the spool.

    Drives be crazy.

    Any tips on how to straighten it out a little bit, before I've fiddled and scratched it all to pieces?

    The film was taken out of the fridge, then kept inside the air-tight package in my inner pocket, until I loaded it in the camera.
    Temperature outside is -4 degrees, and I kept the film in the camera until it had warmed slightly, before it took it out to develop it (camera was still pretty cold though).

    Help? What caused this sick curling, any experiences?
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  2. #2

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    Cause is humidity. Leave to dry and spool in a dry place.

  3. #3

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    I've had some pretty nasty curling with my film before, but I can somehow manage to coax it onto the spool. Sometimes I wind up pulling the lead portion into the reel until I get almost a full wrap on it, then slowly rock the reel for the remainder. I've spent a half-hour at least with some films, I don't have a lot of patience but the film eventually obeys. It can certainly be an exercise in frustration.

    Sorry I can't give more advice.
    I would love to use the "FP" flash setting on my camera, but I cannot find "Flash Powder" anywhere... such is life.

  4. #4
    Helinophoto's Avatar
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    Weird, because the film felt dry to the touch, it's currently inside the paterson tank, but I'll take it out and set the oven on in the room and let it sit there for 1 hour or so and see if it gets better.

    Always feels like an idiot when I stand there in the dark, swearing and fumbling with the film, dropping the spool, crawling around to find it again etc =)
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  5. #5

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    The age might explain it. The longer film remains tightly spooled the more tenacious the “set” of the curl. Film that is stored frozen seems to take more of a fixed “set” than film that was kept at room temperature.

    Due to the width/thickness ratio, tightly “set” 120 films are more difficult to load than 35mm. One possible way to deal with it is to reverse roll the film and place it into a lightproof container for week or so before trying to load it onto a reel. I’d recommend keeping it at room temperature to aid the relaxation process.

    In this way much of the original “set” may relax sufficiently to load the film onto a reel.

  6. #6
    ChristopherCoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helinophoto View Post
    Always feels like an idiot when I stand there in the dark, swearing and fumbling with the film, dropping the spool, crawling around to find it again etc =)


    I tried using a stainless reel once... and only once. I couldn't get the thing loaded, and did exactly like you did for a full 45 minutes or so. I finally gave up and used the ever so easy plastic reel.

  7. #7

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    Once film kinks even if ever so slightly, it will always kink in the same place. Try starting the opposite end of the film on the reel, this often eliminates the problem.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  8. #8
    Helinophoto's Avatar
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    The film was indeed kept stored in the freezer, but another tri-x I shot a couple of weeks back did not have any particular issues (same batch from some left overs that came with the camera I bought, exp date 01.01.2011).

    I'll keep trying a bit and if not, then try Ian's tip.

    I'm already spooling from the "best" side of the film, the other end is so curled that I cannot even straighten it out to mount it on the spool at all =)

    - Getting a nasty, sinking feeling each time the b*stard slips and forms this icky bunched up mess ^^
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  9. #9
    Helinophoto's Avatar
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    Yess!

    Got it loaded, finally!

    I left it out in the dark bathroom for 1 hour while heating the room up.

    The film was still pretty curly and impossible to deal with, but as Crashbox said, trough manually dragging the film almost a whole round and then coaxing it in with very small movements, I was able to spool the film up.

    The film slipped several times while i dragged the film round for the first round and also while twisting the spool to feed the film in, so I had to poke it back into the reel several times.

    Easy does it.

    Now it's going to be interesting to see how much damage my sossage-fingers managed to make while I messed around with it
    Thank you all for useful replies ^^
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  10. #10
    mablo's Avatar
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    I always have problems with stubborn and curling film in winter. I assume it's because the house is heated and air is dry. Today I fought a long time with a roll of 120 Acros and a SS reel in a changing bag. Acros is usually very easy to handle. Last week I had the same problem with a 120 Tri-x roll.

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