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  1. #11
    jp498's Avatar
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    I've got RC prints from 20+ years ago that have been displayed continuously most of their life and are looking great. Mostly Ilford, some Kodak.

    I have one with a yellow spot on it, probably improper washing or fixing, rather than improper material.

    I've got others that went into a photo paper box and were stored in my garage for ten years with no special environmental cares. They are fine too.

    Good washing doesn't mean lengthy washing; too long a wash with RC and your finished print will curl after it's matted and be difficult to flatten. Good washing is <10 minutes and not stacked/overlapping in a manner where water is obstructed from reaching the emulsion.

  2. #12

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    Anything you ever need to know about image permanence can be found there: http://www.wilhelm-research.com/
    Color and B&W prints: http://www.wilhelm-research.com/pdf/..._HiRes_v1a.pdf

  3. #13
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jojje View Post
    Anything you ever need to know about image permanence can be found there: http://www.wilhelm-research.com/
    Color and B&W prints: http://www.wilhelm-research.com/pdf/..._HiRes_v1a.pdf
    That document is almost ten years old and the references in it are from the 1970s and 1980s. We are seeing "Latest Info..." not the usual condemnation of 1970s Kodak Polycontrast Rapid RC.

  4. #14
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Ilford post-card paper has given me recent bronzing problems - the cards were printed about 7 years ago. I have had lots of mid 90's RC prints that have gotten very bronzed indeed; interestingly they were all mounted and framed and there have been no problems with loose prints made in the same darkroom sessions. The bronzed prints were all selenium toned, so it seems Se won't guard against bronzing. One of the bronzed prints had been hanging in my bedroom for 15 years, not an area of heavy pollution. I haven't had any crackling problems (famous last words).

    It can take 10-20 or more years for problems to show up and so all long-term longevity data is going to be from prints made in the 80's and 90's. Obviously there isn't any data on how current papers will look in the year 2021.

    I have had customers return some of the bronzing RCs - I replaced them with FB. Unfortunately there are bronzed RC prints out there with my name on them - I guess that's what really annoys me about the whole issue.

    I no longer sell or give away anything on RC paper, not even Xmas cards. I am stuck with RC for post-cards, though.
    Last edited by Nicholas Lindan; 12-14-2011 at 03:42 PM. Click to view previous post history.
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  5. #15
    PDH
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    I have prints made on GAF RC prints from 72 or 73 that are quite faded, prints made on Kodak paper at the same time are unchanged, could have been printed this morning. I also have family photos from early 1900s that are unfaded, some were on display in my parents home in poor conditions for 60 or 70 years, I doubt at the time the prints were made anyone had any idea what arichival means. Most folks seem to think fiber will outlast RC, only time will tell. For most commerical work, I would use RC, 2 bath fix, and washed as recommended.

  6. #16
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I agree with Nicholas, I have not printed on RC other than contact sheets.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lindan View Post
    Ilford post-card paper has given me recent bronzing problems - the cards were printed about 7 years ago. I have had lots of mid 90's RC prints get very bronzed indeed - interestingly they were all mounted and framed. There have been no problem with loose prints made in the same darkroom sessions. The bronzed prints were all selenium toned, so it seems Se won't guard against bronzing. One of the prints had been hanging in my bedroom for 15 years, not an area of heavy pollution. I haven't had any crackling problems (famous last words).

    It can take 10-20 or more years for problems to show up so all long-term longevity data is going to be from prints made in the 80's and 90's. Obviously there isn't any data on how current papers will look in the year 2021.

    I have had customers return some of the bronzing RCs - I replaced them with FB. Unfortunately there are bronzed RC prints out there with my name on them - I guess that's what really annoys me about the whole issue.

    I no longer sell or give away anything on RC paper, not even Xmas cards. I am stuck with RC for post-cards, though.

  7. #17

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    Good Evening,

    All my contact sheets, dating back to the mid-70's, are on RC paper, almost exclusively Kodabrome RC until it no longer was available. None of them shows any sign of deterioration. I did process carefully, even when I started doing darkroom work, but did not use any selenium toner on contact sheets until recent years.

    Konical

  8. #18
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    I only use RC for contacts, too. I have many going back to the seventies and eighties. There are some which have deteriorated, although my printing methods were always consistent. I never liked the look of RC, and do believe if a negative is worth printing, It's worth printing on fiber paper.

  9. #19
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Many things have been postulated as causes for RC bronzing, among them:

    1) RC manufacturing process that promotes bronzing
    2) Sunlight
    3) Sulfur containing gases
    4) Print under glass

    It is probable that more than one factor is required.
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  10. #20
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    I'm following this thread closely as I too print on fiber for most work, but would like to get back to using RC for more work prints and less than special prints. I think RC is great for contact sheets and also for first time prints with exploring a new negative. Looking at an RC work prints lets me look at cropping, contrast, dodging and burning etc and if I decide the image is worthy it goes to FB. I feel RC is great for 5x7 and 8x10 work. Anything larger seems as someone here once stated "is like printing on a place mat." Large FB is great to print on and hold in hand when finished. I have a few RC prints framed up hanging in my house, exposed to light all day and I've seen no deterioration. They are only about 4 years old though. I know Ralph Lambrecht did an experiment on RC longevity in the first edition Way Beyond Monochrome. I'll be interested to hear his results years from now.

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