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  1. #21

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    I jumped on the RC bandwagon as soon as it came out, and all of my prints from then are just the same now as they were then. My advice would be to not develop longer than specs say use fresh fix and don't fix overly long, and wash at least twice as long as recommended, but not more than that. Any problems I had along the way came from getting sloppy in those three categories, and showed up nearly immediately.

    When I followed the rules, which I did at the beginning when I was paying more attention, no problems developed. The most irritating problem I had was curled edges from too much wet time during a period where I was storing everything in a water bath and washing all the prints together every couple of hours during the day.

  2. #22
    timlayton's Avatar
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    Paper Negatives vs. Film?

    I recently posted a thread asking about the archival information on RC paper and received a lot of great information. I had another thought that I wanted to toss out to the group here to get your input and comments on. I saw on the Badger Graphic site that Kodak has discontinued Tri-X in 8x10, although when I google it I can't find any official statement from Kodak and it seems to be readily available to order from the normal suppliers. That got me to thinking about my paper negative work where I am using RC paper and having to test and establish new processes for an 8x10 film.

    Long story short I would like to know what you think are the pros and cons of using RC paper as a negative vs. Film when the plan is to scan it?

    Tim

  3. #23
    jp498's Avatar
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    RC paper negatives will have a different spectral response compared to normal film. It's not good or bad, just different. Of course it will be a lot slower too in terms of exposure.

    There are plenty of film choices remaining that you don't have to convert to RC paper. Ilford, Foma, Arista, xray film, etc... Unless money is the reason, you can order a bunch of tri-x 8x10 while you can and freeze it. After that, availability depends on Canham creating enough volume for an occasional batch order, and/or turmoil at Kodak.

  4. #24

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    Like mdarnton I have used RC paper since it first appeared - the first one I ever used was the German brand Tura and it was a few years until Kodak, Ilford and Agfa brought out similar papers. In a nutshell the Tura stuff ended up with surface crazing within a few years and was not a great paper anyway in terms of image quality but I've used the other three over many years without significant problems. At one time Agfa RC paper was developer incorporated and if it was stored for a few years before exposure, the base paper layer took on a decided beige to brown tone. This was eventually corrected and up until the time of AgfaPhoto's demise I used their MC RC paper in preference to all others.
    Others have mentioned the critical importance of washing RC paper properly. It does not have to be washed for long but it has to be washed well. An improperly washed RC print will stain more quickly than a poorly washed fibre print. Washing well means flowing water over the print for the entire washing period and not allowing prints to touch each other. Chucking a number of prints in a tray and letting a bit of water flow in will not cut it. The most efficient way I've found to wash RC prints is in a roller processor with two wash tanks plumbed counter-currently but since not many folk have these machines and the washing time is so short anyway, do them one by one in a tray with running water if longevity is important to you. Incidentally, the same washing issues apply equally to colour papers - they are all RC. If you want to see your RA4 prints discolour quickly, just go easy on the water (although unlike B&W, colour can be stabilised instead of washed but that alternative is rapidly being withdrawn on account of toxicity concerns).

    Who knows how long RC prints will last - unlike fibre prints they have not been around long enough to provide concrete evidence of their longevity. But let's remember, the majority of fibre prints that have been made in the last century or so were imperfectly fixed and washed and it is rare to find a hundred year old print that is in anything like original condition or completely without silvering. OzJohn

  5. #25
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    I have many hundred Kodak RC prints from 1972-1975 that were hastily processed and stored in the original cardboard boxes. They have survived in good condition. So have RC prints displayed under glass. Prints displayed without progective glass sometimes developed bronzing.

  6. #26
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I think this thread might be a good candidate for being made a "Sticky" thread. I'll refer that issue to the moderators.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #27
    cmacd123's Avatar
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    FWIW, When I worked at a camera store, we were taken to a demonstartion of the Then New Ilfospeed paper. They had a couple of folks from Ilford in a yellow plastic booth making prints and running them though the wonderful Ilford processor that I probably still covet. The prints were made of a portrait of a young lady eating a strawberry.

    They handed out sample prints which came out washed and dried in about a Minute or two. I found mine years later. and it looked great.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

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