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  1. #11
    cmo
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    If you just want the look of an ortho film you can use any panchromatic film and put a blue filter on the lens, it creates the same effect.
    The future belongs to the few of us still willing to get our hands smell like fixing bath.

  2. #12

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    This is quite true. It can be an excellent alternative to ortho films, many of which are slow, high contrast emulsions.

  3. #13

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    A blue filter will duplicate the look of an unsensitized emulsion. A green filter will approximate the look of orthochromatic film. But for the best redition you need to use a minus red filter. If you look at the color wheeel you will see that this is a cyan filter.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #14
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    I don't leave the house to photograph w/o both Ilford Ortho and Lith film in addition to the FP4+ which is always present.
    For me Ilford EI is 80 in daylight and 50 in tungsten.Lith film is 6 and 4 respectively.
    There is nothing like these films for opening up the shadows, particularly in forest scenes. For portraits it is necessary to remember that reds will print as black. I develop by inspection with a red safelight.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  5. #15

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    Wratten 44A is sometimes used. It's essentially a minus-red.

  6. #16
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    Thanks for all the wonderful tips. The film is cheap enough for me to play. Xray film offers interesting possibilities. I like the idea of souping the film under a dim safelight. No excuse for badly processed ortho film.

  7. #17
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    I've been playing with aerographic duplicating film. I bought a 500 foot roll of the stuff and an 8x9.5 inch sheet costs me about 40 cents. I have rated the film at ISO 5 and meter through a blue filter. Then I develop it under a red safelight (tray) in Ansco 130 for a whole minute. Really quick, really cheap, and so far really interesting, especially with fair-skinned people or at times of low light.

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