Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,827   Posts: 1,582,063   Online: 810
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,190
    Images
    6

    Orthochromatic film

    I'm thinking of experimenting with orthochromatic film. Is the film has the same color sensitivity has BW paper? If so, may I soup the film under a safe light similar to BW papers? Do you meter the film just like panochromatic film?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,083
    You can usually use a relatively dim red safelight if the film is slow but be sure to test for fogging and safe time. The spectral sensitivity of most Ortho films is not sharp cutting, nor is the spectral transmission of most safelights, so testing is important to make sure you have enough safe time depending on what you're doing with it. I use ortho film for masking so I need to see what I'm doing, and need a relatively long safe time. If you're using it in-camera you might as well treat it like any other film and process it in the dark to be safest. My two cents.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    16,878
    Images
    23
    hi there

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/8...-pan-film.html
    this thread i started a while back might be of some help

    there are different types of non-panchromatic emulsions,
    and it all depends on which sort of emulsion you are planning to use ...

    have fun !
    john

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,075
    Metering is the same, but you have to remember that the film has very different speeds for daylight and tungsten light. You may sometimes need to take into account the film's lack of sensitivity to red light with certain subjects. Filter factors are also quite different.

  5. #5
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,754
    Images
    40
    Play with some x-ray film -- it is ortho and cheap. I cut to size under a red safe light, load it into my holders and develop it under a red safelight. Though it might pick up extra sensitivity in the developer, so you might want to reduce the safe light once you put the film in the developer.

    I did not know one of my boys had many freckles until I did a portrait of him on 8x10 x-ray film! He was wearing red clothes, too.

    Calder
    Platinum/palladium print
    X-ray film
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Calder, 8x10P.jpg  
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  6. #6
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,190
    Images
    6
    Hey thanks for all the great advice. I'm going to have to look for some X-ray film. When film is cheap, it makes it easier to experiment and play.

  7. #7
    Andrew O'Neill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Coquitlam, BC, Canada
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    698
    Images
    9
    I use xray film a lot. It is okay under amber coloured safelight as well. I order from cxsonline. Are you going to be contact printing? Please note that this film has emulsion on both sides and that may reduce sharpness a bit when enlarging. Some people remove the rear emulsion with bleach. I contact print so don't bother bleaching.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Shropshire, UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    829
    Images
    7
    Some ortho film is quite fast. Ilford Ortho is about ISO 80 - so WAY faster than paper. It seems to be a bit sensitive to red, too. I have developed it under a deep ruby red safelight at a long distance from the lamp, but my usual, brighter and 'more red' darkroom lights would fog it. To be honest, the deep red light is too dim to see much, though, so why bother? I prefer to use time development, it is what I'm used to.

    The kodak lith film I've got is much, much slower and you can play with that under normal red safelights.
    Steve

  9. #9
    winger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Page County, IA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,499
    Images
    47
    What developer do people use for X-ray film?

    I have a few sheets of Arista ortholith left and I guess I can't buy more. I like that I can use my paper developer (Ilford multigrade).

  10. #10
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,754
    Images
    40
    The portraits I did of my boys was with the blue-sensitive x-ray film. The boys were in open shade. I exposed a set at 400ASA and at 800ASA. The film was processed at the hospital's x-ray lab, so I had no control there. I used the set exposed at 800 ASA as the 400ASA set was very dense. However, get this film into the dense forest, and the working ASA drops like a rock.

    The x-ray film scratches very easily during processing, so that has to be watched. I develop x-ray film in the same developer as my conventional films (ilford PQ Universal), some folks use pryo developers, too.

    Bryce
    8x10 Platinum/palladium Print
    x-ray film

    And the same again with Alex...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bryce, 8x10P.jpg   Alex, 8x10P.jpg  
    Last edited by Vaughn; 12-15-2011 at 07:52 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin