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  1. #11

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    developing old plus-x and tri-x from 1950's

    Hello GoodMarie: I'm in the process of developing a large number of old B&W roll films that I was given last month.They varied in type of film(Verichrome and verichrome pan,plus-x,super-xx and Ansco plenachrome.I did a Google search for processing old film and of the results I chose to use HC-110 dilution "A" at 64 degrees F and between 8 to 10 minutes.The colder temp helps keep emulsion swelling down and the high developer concentration helps to keep the fog levels down. Just make sure that the temperature of the other chemistry is at or close to the developer to avoid swelling of the emulsion and reticulation.

    The other respondents are correct in that the slower speed films will have less fog than the faster speed films.Anyway thats my two cents worth.Good Luck.

    Doug

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
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    My 1970 Kodak Master Darkroom Dataguide gives the same recommendation for Plus-X Pan, Plus-X Pan Professional, Tri-X Pan and Tri-X Pan Professional (in roll film and 35mm sizes).

    HC-110 - 68F - 5 minutes
    HC-110 - 64F - 6 1/4 minutes

    As a matter of comparison, the 1970 recommendations for Plus-X Pan Professional in D-76 is 6 minutes - quite a bit of difference from phfitz' recommendations from 1954.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13

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    Hello;
    Plus-X at this time was rated at 50 while Tri-X was 200. Use D-76 full strength, water bath, Kodak fixer with hardener at 68 degrees. Developing time should be 10-12 minutes. Do a test strip of each first and adjust times as needed, Steven.

  4. #14
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    My venerable 1965 edition of the Kodak Darkroom Dataguide shows both Tri-X Pan and Plus-X Pan Professional in HC110 dilution B as about 4.5 minutes @ 68ºF for average contrast; D-76 straight was 6.5. But that may be after the switch to ISO ratings vs ASA, and whatever else happened with that. I must confess my memory is a bit fuzzy on when that transition occurred (even though I lived through it!) Obviously some clip tests, etc. would be well advised.

  5. #15

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    This is my method for old films or unknown 35mm films...

    I cut the leader off about 3-4 inches and take it to the light. (It most likely did not hold any photos). Then, using a little suspension bridge fashioned from paper clips, I lower the first 1/2" into a vial of my developer. After 4 minutes, I lower another 1/2" and each 2 minutes after that.

    When the last segment has been in there 4 minutes I take it out, rinse and drop it into a cup of fixer for 5 minutes.

    Then, looking through the film into the light, I choose the stripe that is dark enough that only a tiny amount of light can be seen through. I use that time for my development.

    This should get you useable negatives and if you have many rolls, you can adjust from there.

    At least you don't risk loosing a whole roll or cutting potentially irreplaceable frames into pieces to test strips.
    - Bill Lynch

  6. #16
    cmacd123's Avatar
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    two notes:

    1: The switch from 200 to 400 asa for tri-x was in the 1950 era, but the film was not changed - just the way the speed was rated so you can ignore that one.

    2: I just used a roll of Double-x 5222 from my freezer that was from 1985, it was fairly foggy but the images will probaly print.

    2.5: in the early 1970's A friend bought some old darkroom stuff with some tri-x from 1956. it liklwise had lost speed to shoot, but did make useable images even though we did not know what we were doing at the time.

    Good Luck.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  7. #17
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    A guy named Mark Antony used to post here on APUG, and he specialized in processing old rolls of film. You might find a lot of value by seeking out his posts via Google. Just type in as search string: site:www.apug.org mark Antony old film and you should be able to fetch lots of info.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #18

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    Have old Tech Manual info

    Attached are two scans from a 1947 Kodak tech guide showing info on Plus-x in 35mm format. Tri-x is listed in the guide, but only for roll and sheet film, no 35mm. Time for Plus-x in D76 is 16 minutes in a tank with intermittent agitation. My other guide is from 1966. It shows a time of 5.8 minutes for D76 and Plus-x (135 format).

    These are quite different times. They obviously changed Plus-x significantly in those 19 years.
    Attached Files

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