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  1. #11
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by largely View Post
    Since you would need to work on a wet print I think excessive diffusion might be a problem.

    Tim Rudman recommends a "dry" bleach made with iodine,thiocarbimide and methyl alcohol which can be used on dry prints without the "creeping" effect of ferri type bleaches. It allows much finer detail and also can achieve reduction to paper white if desired. It seems like this might work better with a ruling pen.
    See page 113 of his "Masters Printers Handbook" for the formula and a description of the technique which is also different than wet reduction.

    good luck,

    Larry
    Can anyone post the formula or directions for this bleach? thanks if so...

  2. #12
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Tim Rudman's "Dry" Bleach

    From his book, Master Printing Course...

    Thiocarbamide, or iodine in alcohol, makes an excellent reducer which can be used on a dry print. It is particularly useful for fine work as the bleach does not 'creep' in the same way that it would on a wet print, and therefore allows finer work...

    Sol. A
    Iodine 2.3g
    Methyl Alcohol 50mL

    Sol. B
    Thiocarbamide 4.6g
    in warm water to 50mL

    Sol. C
    Methyl alcohol

    Mix small equal quantities of solutions A, B, & C immediately before use, and work with a brush on a dry print in daylight. After applying the solution, swab it off with methyl alcohol (methanol). It is wise to wear a latex or rubber glove on your swabbing hand since prolonged contact with methyl alcohol dries your fingers out considerably.

    Whereas ferri in fixer quickly needs topping up, if you use a small quantity of thiocarbamide solution it can get stronger as the alcohol evaporates.

    After thiocarbamide-iodine bleaching, it is important to put the print straight into fresh fixer without first rinsing it in water, which induces silver-sulphide staining.

    If these instructions are followed, reduction can be taken right down to the paper's base without staining. However, staining will occur if the solution is used too strong, if it is not fixed as described, or if it is used after other bleaches on fibre-based paper without an hour's thorough washing in between.

  3. #13

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    Drawing a thin opaque line on a sheet of clear acetate and either sandwiching it in contact with the negative or with the print might be a lot easier than messing with chemicals and wet or dry prints. If you're trying to bleach a finished print, you'll probably have a very high error rate. You might even be able to find some very narrow rubylith tape that could be cut even narrower and applied to the acetate. This would leave a very thin, clean line.

    Peter Gomena

  4. #14
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    How about doing it in the darkroom. You can draw an acetate with a red pen for BW prints then use it as a mask when you expose your print.

  5. #15
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    The acetate might work well with what I had in mind. Though it'd be a tad tricky to enlarge it in this way, though not impossible.

  6. #16

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    That's the answer. Red or black pen/sharpie on acetate on top of the unexposed paper.

  7. #17
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    i have never tried it, but s ruling pen filled with farmers instead of ink may work with a raised ruler.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  8. #18
    John Austin's Avatar
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    Go back one stage and use a piece of wire just finer than the line you want, paint it mat black so you do not have odd edge reflection problettes and lay it on the paper while the red swing filter is in

    For very fine work removing black spots from dust in the sky on prints from LF negs I work with concentrated ferricyanide with a fine brush on dry prints - I would not like to try this with a pen and ruler, but you can - A shock and awe bleach option is iodine+cyanide reducer, but be careful as the shock and awe could get a little close with this one
    Last edited by John Austin; 03-08-2012 at 06:02 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: First cited Monkhovens intensifier when I meant iodine+cyanide

  9. #19
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Thanks Grumpy,

    The idea I have (this idea is quite an enigma, no? ) requires a plurality of fine white lines. I love drawing, and I think there are a lot of options for creativity with the ability to "write" with bleach.

  10. #20
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Or in the darkroom, write/draw with fix, leave, wash, dry, expose.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

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