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  1. #11

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    Yes, that would rock with RV reflectors.

    Does your meter have an incident bulb? To my understanding, the spot meter is useful when placing zones and considering expansion or contraction. There are many different values on the faces, even with something like a 5 degree spot meter.

    As far as what exactly is happening during agitation, I can't pretend to know much more than it is a variable that plays a part in the contrast of your negative. I find that a little more or a little less is a very subtle way to exert control, with a great degree of accuracy and reproduceability (is that a word?).

  2. #12
    Katie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    Katie, my advice would be forget about experimenting with film/developer combinations and stick to one combination you are happy with. The problem with this image is focus.
    Advice from the old dog.
    Clive - I do hope you know that I was teasing you!! And focus? I used a shallow depth of field here, but can assure you that the people are in fact in focus.

    BUT - the point of this post is how do I consistently maintain deep midtones with bright but contrary highlights on HP5 and ID11.???

  3. #13
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    Katie, then is it slight camera shake? Can you post a blow up of the boys hair?

  4. #14
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    I think that what you are liking the most is the appearance of your mid-tones.

    Changes in exposure affect the shadow tones the most, followed by the mid-tones, with the highlights the least.

    Development/agitation affects the highlights the most, then the mid-tones next and the shadow tones the least of all. It also has a big affect on the local contrast.

    Your open-shade plus RV reflection lighting segment gives you great gobs of blueish, low contrast light. So your negative can stand a fair amount of contrast boost without harming the mid-tones.

    I would concentrate on your mid-tones when you meter and adjust your development. Tailor the development so as to get the local contrast in your mid-tones the way you like, and the rest will follow (generally).

    You do have to have something close to the right distribution of light though in order to get dark shadows.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #15
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    This is a neg scan, right? So it was auto-leveled by your scan software. We'd need to see the actual neg with no inversion or auto correction, otherwise it's difficult to tell what you did...

    Assuming that it is a bit overexposed and normally developed, there will tend to be less highlight differentiation but a lot of midtone detail, which I think we see.

    My suggestion is to shoot the same scene with full subject brightness range in a wide bracket: EV -2, -1, 0, +1, and +2, and develop normally. Make contact prints or scan them together and compare the differences. All will be clear.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  6. #16
    Katie's Avatar
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    Thank you ! Yes this is a neg scan, but my print looks basically the same. When I scan, I do it totally manually and do not use auto anything, so while it's vastly different from printing, gives me a general idea as to how it prints (along with my standard method of contact printing too).

  7. #17
    keithwms's Avatar
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    I understand. I scan quite a lot, just for keeping records and sharing online etc. and I find the scanned products to fairly closely mimic the darkroom results.

    The main things to understand is that the slope of the exposure/density curve affects differentiation. The steepest part of the curve gives the most differentiation between adjacent tones. So if you want more shadow/midtone detail and don't mind the highlights clumping, you tend to overexpose neutral grey. The purpose of my proposed bracketing experiment is to show that you can get very different looks just by altering your camera exposure by a stop or two.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  8. #18
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
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    I agree with Keith on a stop or two can gain a lot.
    But experimenting with different film and developer combinations is extremelly funny and can turn a ordinary man to wise man.
    Earlier than the 90s , before digital , there were thousands of pages printed by photography magazines on that lens,developer,film and paper try , comparison experiments.
    I think if you are a Ilford fun , FP4 and Pyro developer combination gives the most exceptional tones.
    If you are going to USA , you are already there , Tri X and 1/31 diluted HC 110 was Ansel Adams recipe and it is number one for me.
    If you invest Hassy , invest in these two combinations and money,time well spent.
    And a book on Zone System.

    Umut

  9. #19

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    hi katie

    since everyone is making suggestions, i'll make mine too

    it seems that your negative is over exposed by a few stops and
    you might have over developed your negative, by a good 30% using normal agitation.
    the highlights while they aren't blocked. they are dense enough not to have many details but the mid tones sing.

    to recreate this, i would photograph in a shaded place with open sky
    where light can bounce to the sides of your subject ( foam core would work if
    you don't have a 3-sided greenhouse ( avedon ), or RVs to bounce the light for you
    your meter will read for the sky, but i am sure if you read off a gray card or the palm of your hand
    and add a stop, you will notice it is a good stop or 2 different. expose for the grey card/ hand value.

    using sprint ( its like ID 11 ) and adding a few mins to development will give negatives that
    san+print like that, ansco 130 1:6 for about 8 mins will give you a similar look too,
    and mixing about 15cc of ansco into 1L of caffenol C, and not agitating at all for 26mins
    will also give you a similar look.

    have fun ( and good luck ) !
    john
    im empty, good luck

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Katie View Post
    And could you humor me and explain scientifically what agitation does in the development process? I would like to understand it better...
    It keeps fresh developer over the silver sites. This promotes even development and better contrast. If the developer does not move, it gets depleted where is contacts the silver halide. The more dense the the area, the faster the depletion.

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