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  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    In my relatively limited experience, scanners really accentuate the apparent amount of dust and surface imperfections on Black and White film (and Kodachrome). So don't be too discouraged, especially if you intend to begin printing in a darkroom.

    If possible, you should try to separate the scanning and printing steps. The one digital tool I appreciate the most is the "Clone/Heal" tool. If you can do your "spotting" before the file is printed, it will help.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #12
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Yes, well, for scanning you are really fighting a number of losing battles when you use traditional b&w films and developers. With c41 films, you can at least use ICE. And with pyro you don't see as exaggerated grain. Traditionally developed b&w film was born to be printed... optically... on traditional photo paper!!!!
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  3. #13

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    One way I have found that works well for removing drying marks to paint them away. By that I mean I have a small soft paint brush. I wet it with a small amount of distilled water and just brush the spot. Then allow it to dry. It usually takes only a few minutes to dry since the emulsion is not fully wetted.

    I also have to say that I have a lot of negatives that don't looks so great as a scan but make fantastic prints. Scanning is a good way to proof your negatives but ususally a real wet print brings out the most in a negative.

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