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  1. #11
    Hexavalent's Avatar
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    Great if you develop film with buckshot.

    YAWN
    - Ian

  2. #12

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    You simply don't get it: its the opposite its a roadmap to translate all those weird US recipes to modern standards....

  3. #13
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    I see someone's been using wolframalpha:
    http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i...+per+fortnight

    Lee

    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Keyes View Post
    Last year I had to record a gas flow setting of 2 cm/sec in a gas chromatograph SOP, so I converted it to units of furlongs/fortnight and slipped that into the SOP. My peer level reviewer caught it and agreed to let it go, but no one else that reviewed the document mentioned it...

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee L View Post
    I see someone's been using wolframalpha:
    http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i...+per+fortnight

    Lee
    Nahhh - I did it the old fashioned way - I looked up the conversions in my 18th Ed of the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, printed in 1932. I keep it on my desk at work as it's so handy.

    OK - It wasn't completely the old fashioned way. I didn't to the math by hand, or even with a slide rule, I used a 1990-vintage TI-85 calculator.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  5. #15
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    In reply to posts #8 and 10, I would like to mention two facts not obvious to the casual observer here.

    1. Kitchen flatware sets have teaspoons and tablespoons which vary according to manufacturer and style. There are also wide variations in the sizes of drinking cups. Both of these vary over a fair range and are not accurate. There are standards for measuring spoons and measuring cups. The variations can cause quite a "gotcha" if you use the wrong thing in the darkroom.

    2. Gunpowder measurement is done by volume BUT two things hold true here. One is that the powder is made to very precise standards of size and shape for which the volumes are given in tables for the sake of precision and the other is that grains of powder are cut by the measuring device to assure uniform delivery of quantity. The old timers calibrated their powder systems by weight before they went to volumetric delivery, and they used powder that was uniform. Before the creation of corned powder, gunpowder was just a mix of the 3 ingredients and no method of delivery could assure uniform accuracy. In fact, powder trains were often surrounded by a haze of flammable or explosive dust due to the separation. Often the powder separated into layers in the powder wagons.

    And, BTW, we had to calculate the speed of light in furlongs per fortnight back in the 50s. It was a popular request by physics professors in that era.

    PE

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by analog what is that? View Post
    You simply don't get it: its the opposite its a roadmap to translate all those weird US recipes to modern standards....
    Many of the "old arcane developers" (OP) use grains, drams, minims etc., - it is by no means an exclusively "weird US recipes" issue. Most of those units of measure were inherited from Europe. Even those old measurements made clear distinctions between volume and weight (mass).
    - Ian

  7. #17

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    You inherited ALL from us kid!
    Me I prefer French measures of course.............

  8. #18
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    Who is "you"?
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  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by analog what is that? View Post
    The Darlkroom cookbook, 2. ed. has tables on this from page 265 onwards, just punch the numbers into any 4-banger calculator.....

    More importantly it has a very important table at page 275 : Teaspoon conversions, solving the riddle a certain blogger has been struggling with......
    Anyone familiar with homeloading ammo will know that volumetric measures, like teaspoons and such is more than accurate enough to measure out very small amounts of powder.

    naaah

    the folks who originated caffenol used teaspoon measures because caffenol is a "kitchen sink developer"
    made from household materials, and why not use something that everyone has in their drawer, a teaspoon.
    caffenol does not require exact measures, so it doesn't matter if the teaspoon measure is exact or way off ...
    i haven't used a teaspoon to measure my caffenol in almost 6 years, and it works just fine.
    i am not really sure what riddle you are referring to. a lot of the caffenol buzz now has to do with people
    being exact / precise and scaling everything out, and adding things like salt or kbr or whatever
    to turn it into an "upscale developer", rather than a "kitchen sink developer".

    me, i eyeball measure, all my ingredients, and i am sure some of the folks loading rounds on their kitchen table
    did the same thing. in the end it really doesn't matter, as long as you were too busy guzzling a rundlet ...
    Last edited by jnanian; 01-01-2012 at 12:09 PM. Click to view previous post history.
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  10. #20
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    However, measuring powder on the table can lead to a squib. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squib_load

    Your next shot might be your last!

    PE

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