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  1. #1

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    Taking the film out of the canister

    Hi

    I know two ways of getting the film out of the canister, but what are the pros and cons?

    1) Open the canister at the bottom with a bottle opener and take the spool out. (I use this now)

    2) Use a leader receiver to get the film leader out and wind the development spool directly from the canister. (I stopped using this as I suspect this method to make small scratches on the film when unloading the canister).

    Morten

  2. #2
    titrisol's Avatar
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    I use method 2 usually. I hand rewind wo I leave the film leader visible.
    Scratches from the leader rettriever only on the 1st turn of the film (which is fogged anyways)

    Sometimes i just rip the canister (when I haven't bulk loaded) open by putting my finger in the felt area and rip the cartridge open.
    Mama took my APX away.....

  3. #3
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I figure it's less risky just to open the canister. Why take the chance of damage by pulling the film back through the light trap?
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #4
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    While I use method one, I have also use (in the distant past) the pair of pliers method.
    In my reload years, using the old "snap caps", all I needed was a solid flat surface to band the nipple on.
    "Just because nobody complains doesn't mean all parachutes are perfect."

  5. #5

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    Morten my vote is method 2. I have in the past needed to keep changing rolls mid-way through and never had any problems with scratches. Also I find loading the spirals easier with the film coming out of the canister a few frames as a time.

  6. #6
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Only been developing my own stuff a couple of weeks, but I too prefer method two. If the film jams or sticks while winding it into the spirals I figure I can carefully wind it back into the cassette. Then I can open up the changing bag and check out the spiral for any wet spots. Have had no scratches. Yet.
    If I ripped open the canister , the way I see it, I think I'd lose a roll of shots trying to sort things out!


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  7. #7

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    film canister

    Quote Originally Posted by modafoto
    Hi

    I know two ways of getting the film out of the canister, but what are the pros and cons?

    1) Open the canister at the bottom with a bottle opener and take the spool out. (I use this now)

    2) Use a leader receiver to get the film leader out and wind the development spool directly from the canister. (I stopped using this as I suspect this method to make small scratches on the film when unloading the canister).

    Morten
    I use method 1 and in addition I cut the leader off the film before opening the canister and trim the corners off the film to make loading into the spool easier.

    I also dry the spool with a hair dryer which helps with the loading and I have no problems with film sticking while loading.

  8. #8
    garryl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy K
    If I ripped open the canister , the way I see it, I think I'd lose a roll of shots trying to sort things out!
    But you can always roll the film up and put in the developer tank with the lid on as it also is light tight. But to each his own way that works!
    "Just because nobody complains doesn't mean all parachutes are perfect."

  9. #9
    Blighty's Avatar
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    Taking the film out of the canister

    Morten,
    The method I use is simply to leave the film in the canister. Pull out 6 inches or so (maybe I should rephrase that!), wind it onto the spiral, pull out another 6 inches or so and continue 'til you're at the end of the roll. When you reach the end, simply cut the film from the canister. Never had any scratches or problems whatsoever with this method. Obviously it helps not to mistake your fingers for the film. Couldn't agree more with rounding off the leading edge of the film. Makes loading up a doddle and works well with 120 as well. Regards, BLIGHTY.

  10. #10
    Monophoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by modafoto
    Hi

    I know two ways of getting the film out of the canister, but what are the pros and cons?

    1) Open the canister at the bottom with a bottle opener and take the spool out. (I use this now)

    2) Use a leader receiver to get the film leader out and wind the development spool directly from the canister. (I stopped using this as I suspect this method to make small scratches on the film when unloading the canister).

    Morten
    Morten -

    I use a modified version of (2).

    I bulk load my film, and my cameras require a manual rewind. So I try to stop rewinding as soon as I sense that the end of the film has come off of the take-up spool in the camera. Then, I use the scissors on my Swiss Army knife to cut the end of the film off, and trip it in preparation for loading onto the processing spiral. This assures that I recognize that the film has been exposed, and therefore not double-expose it.

    In the darkroom, I pull the film back out through the felt light trap. I know that there is a theoretical risk that grit in the felt could scratch the film. But I've been doing it this way for 25+ years - almost 1000 rolls of film - with no problems so far.

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