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  1. #11
    ParkerSmithPhoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I think you are talking about completely bleaching out a print then re-developing as in two step sepia toning. I was thinking more of bleaching spots or all to lighten, then fix to remove
    Yes, I was thinking back to school when I would print a little dark and then drop the whole thing in the bleach to pop the highlights, or do the brush technique. My memory is that I always followed the light bleaching with a fixer bath, which can give you a nice rose tone.

    So, after bleaching, you either have to tone (for color) OR fix (to make the lightened highlights permanent) but not both, and after just wash it (ie. you don't need to fix after sepia).

    Simplifying the question: A bleached print would not be stable without either toning or fixing. True? False?
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  2. #12

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    Um, partly true? If the bleach contained a halide, then yes it is true. I assume when you say toning you mean an indirect toner. I've tried using gold and selenium as an indirect toner, as you would sepia, and I destroyed lots of prints and perfectly good chemicals.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Ian:

    Bob Carnie fixes as well, and doesn't even try to defend it.
    .
    I'm not so sure that he does.

    I'm fairly sure it is diluted bleach, wash, tone, wash, lather, rinse, repeat a la Schwab.
    Kick his ass, Sea Bass!

  4. #14
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    A fine fellow I worked with fixed his prints half way, and held them in a holding bath with slow running water. Towards the end of the work day he viewed each print on an easel prepared selectively bleach, then back into the holding bath. The batch of prints were then fixed to completion, rinsed, hypo-cleared with dilute selenium toner, and washed. I believe he picked up the selective bleaching routine from Eugene Smith.

  5. #15

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    So far--unless I missed it--my favorite sequence has been left out: Se-tone, bleach (partial, often very little) then fix. And wash afterwards. Picked up from the late Barry Thornton's Edge of Darkness, available on Amazon for a song, comparatively. The results are often very Olivia-Parker-esque, at least when Ilford MG WT is the paper.

  6. #16
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    OK.

  7. #17
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    Dinesh is correct

    I always tone after bleaching , actually bleach, wash , tone , wash .

    Sometimes I will local bleach for retouch purpose , then wash fix then wash, but I do not think this is what the OP is talking about.

    Bob

  8. #18
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    This is a technique I have used . My retoucher Rose Scheler will bleach retouch then re fix a washed fiber print I supply her.
    I will then do my toning and back to her for final spotting.
    I believe Salgado's craftsmen/women do exactly the same thing on all his fibre exhibition prints.
    Quote Originally Posted by jmcd View Post
    A fine fellow I worked with fixed his prints half way, and held them in a holding bath with slow running water. Towards the end of the work day he viewed each print on an easel prepared selectively bleach, then back into the holding bath. The batch of prints were then fixed to completion, rinsed, hypo-cleared with dilute selenium toner, and washed. I believe he picked up the selective bleaching routine from Eugene Smith.

  9. #19

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    Bob,

    Is what you say true with Selenium also? I always thought complete fixing is a requirement before Selenium bath. Isn't bleaching thus turning metalic silver BACK same thing as incomplete fixing??
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  10. #20
    ParkerSmithPhoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by An Le-qun View Post
    So far--unless I missed it--my favorite sequence has been left out: Se-tone, bleach (partial, often very little) then fix. And wash afterwards. Picked up from the late Barry Thornton's Edge of Darkness, available on Amazon for a song, comparatively. The results are often very Olivia-Parker-esque, at least when Ilford MG WT is the paper.
    Oh, I like that very much. Thanks for the reminder about her work. Hadn't looked at her in years, beautiful photography.

    Also, check out Emmet Gowin's aerial landscape photography to see some beautiful toning.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
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