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  1. #1
    ParkerSmithPhoto's Avatar
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    Bleaching Basics

    Okay, it's been probably 15 years since I bleached a silver print, and I'm wanting to make sure I remember correctly:

    Bleach the print with ferri and choose one (but not more than one)

    1) fix it, to make the bleach permanent
    2) tone it in sepia to redevelop the image as warm tone
    3) redevelop the print in standard print developer (ie. Dektol)

    After doing one of these, just wash the print. You don't have to fix after redevelopment.

    Do I have that right? I know I can selenium tone after the above steps, or before, which is how most of my prints are finished. I used to bleach a lot in college, but that's a painfully long time past.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
    Atlanta, GA

    Commercial & Fine Art Photography
    Portrait Photography

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    No way !!!!!!!! fixer is out of the question.

    Bleach, wash, then toner. Then wash again.

    Ian

  3. #3
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ParkerSmithPhoto View Post
    Okay, it's been probably 15 years since I bleached a silver print, and I'm wanting to make sure I remember correctly:

    Bleach the print with ferri and choose one (but not more than one)

    1) fix it, to make the bleach permanent
    2) tone it in sepia to redevelop the image as warm tone
    3) redevelop the print in standard print developer (ie. Dektol)

    After doing one of these, just wash the print. You don't have to fix after redevelopment.

    Do I have that right? I know I can selenium tone after the above steps, or before, which is how most of my prints are finished. I used to bleach a lot in college, but that's a painfully long time past.
    I am not too sure if you are talking about toning or bleaching, but as the title of your thread is bleaching - There are plenty of different ways of bleaching in photography, but if you mean with Potassium Ferricyanide solutions, then I think the printer in this video shows a perfect way of doing it. Note how she adds the bleach solution and almost immediately washes it away, at what concentration (guess 1:10 from stock). A gradual process.

    http://www.laboratoire-tirages-argen...ation-eng.html

  4. #4
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Ian:

    Bob Carnie fixes as well, and doesn't even try to defend it.

    I've just recently started using fixer after toning or redevelopment, but for an ulterior purpose. It is a hardening fixer (the only one I use) and, per PE's suggestion, an apparently effective way of hardening without the challenges of having to mix separate hardener (which is apparently a relatively finicky process).

    I of course wash after the the additional fixer.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Ian:

    Bob Carnie fixes as well, and doesn't even try to defend it.

    I've just recently started using fixer after toning or redevelopment, but for an ulterior purpose. It is a hardening fixer (the only one I use) and, per PE's suggestion, an apparently effective way of hardening without the challenges of having to mix separate hardener (which is apparently a relatively finicky process).

    I of course wash after the the additional fixer.

    It's really depedant on the toning process and particularly whether toning's to completion. There can be a case for re-fixing with some processes, there can even be a case for re-bleaching and fixing after some toners like dye coupler toners.

    However with some toners refixing will destroy the colour / tones entirely so ideally sufficient reading / research needs to be done at the outset, or follow manufacturers instructions.

    I did a lot of commercial research into toners and hardening was never an issue unless a hardening fixer was used prior to toning, then a softening bath was needed to ensure ven toning.

    The OP's question is rather broad so needs a more simple answer.

    Ian

  6. #6

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    I'm curious on this one as well.

    Ralph says in "Way Beyond..." book to use Ferri, wash, then fix, so that un-converted silver can be removed. I understand, for most toners, complete fix is important as staining can occurred. Can you please explain in layman's term, why the discrepancy exists between what you say and Ralph says?

    I typically use two step sepia toner, brown toner, and selenium if that makes difference.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  7. #7
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Is this thread about toning or bleaching?

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    I am not too sure if you are talking about toning or bleaching, but as the title of your thread is bleaching - There are plenty of different ways of bleaching in photography, but if you mean with Potassium Ferricyanide solutions, then I think the printer in this video shows a perfect way of doing it. Note how she adds the bleach solution and almost immediately washes it away, at what concentration (guess 1:10 from stock). A gradual process.

    http://www.laboratoire-tirages-argen...ation-eng.html
    ......and then places the partially bleached print into the second fix!

    Regards,
    John

  9. #9
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I'm curious on this one as well.

    Ralph says in "Way Beyond..." book to use Ferri, wash, then fix, so that un-converted silver can be removed. I understand, for most toners, complete fix is important as staining can occurred. Can you please explain in layman's term, why the discrepancy exists between what you say and Ralph says?

    I typically use two step sepia toner, brown toner, and selenium if that makes difference.

    Your missing a step:

    "use Ferri, wash, then fix, so that un-converted silver can be removed." You MUST tone after the bleach and wash or fixing will remove all the image.

    Ian

  10. #10

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    Ian,

    Are we possibly talking about two different processes? I think you are talking about completely bleaching out a print then re-developing as in two step sepia toning. I was thinking more of bleaching spots or all to lighten, then fix to remove - then follow up with additional toning if necessary.

    In OP's terms, you are case #2 and I'm #1
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

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