Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,867   Posts: 1,583,204   Online: 868
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    317

    126 film anyone?

    Anyone have some old cartridges laying around?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada. Ex-California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    346
    This may still be available in Nova Scotia: 6 black & white Snapshooter Club Film in original packaging along with camera that fits the film. $30.

    http://halifax.kijiji.ca/c-buy-and-s...AdIdZ289919586

  3. #3
    michaelbsc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    South Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,106
    Images
    5
    I don't have any, but my understanding is that you cannot simply pack 35mm film into them. The sprocket holes are wrong.

    Do I misunderstand this? Or do you have unperf'd film?
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  4. #4
    hpulley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,214
    Images
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    I don't have any, but my understanding is that you cannot simply pack 35mm film into them. The sprocket holes are wrong.

    Do I misunderstand this? Or do you have unperf'd film?
    I prefer to use unperforated film (Ultrafine unperforated 35mm 100' Kodak Portra 160NC for example) but you can use perforated film if you like the 'sprocket hole in the picture' look. To defeat the sprocket hole problem you generally cut or grind the sprocket hole 'finger' off in the camera and then you need to wind carefully for the correct amount of film (and long enough to cock the shutter as most Instamatics don't have separate cocking mechanisms).

    I need all my cartridges, sorry!
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    293
    Images
    64
    I have two or three 126 cartridges I got with a box of cameras a while ago. Partially exposed if that means anything. I won't be using them so happy to send them along for the price of shipping if you like.

    Cheers,

    John
    Nikon 35mm, Mamiya 645 & RB67, Leica IIIb, other bits and pieces

  6. #6
    Fragomeni's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    519
    Using 35mm in 126 cartridges is quite easy and the sprocket holes don't effect anything if you make a simple adjustment to the camera. I've described this in a couple posts on my website along with a couple 126 Instamatic cameras I've worked on. Check it out and email or message me if you have any questions or need any guidance. I was searching around for the cartridges not too long ago and had a few sent my way but I'm using both that I have.
    Francesco Fragomeni
    www.FrancescoFragomeni.com

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1

    Got some

    I have a bunch of Fuji 126 - expired but cool stored and still in the original foil wrapping. How many do you want?

    Bill

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    317
    Awesome - just watched a tutorial on loading 126 cartridges with 35mm. Never knew it was so easy

  9. #9
    Fragomeni's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    519
    Yep, not hard at all. You'll need to make the necessary modification in the camera to get it to work with the newly loaded cartridge (loaded with 35mm). The sprocket holes in the 35mm film with catch the shutter cocking tooth that protrudes into the film gate and it will lock the film advance lever preventing further movement and proper film advance. Disassembling the camera and separating the shutter plate from the camera body (just a few screws hold it in place) will allow you to remove the arm attached the the tooth (it pretty much just comes right out once the plate with the shutter is temporarily detached). Once that arm is removed the shutter will cock when the film advance lever is fully engaged one time and you will be able to advance the lever as many times as necessary to achieve proper film advance without the lever locking.
    Francesco Fragomeni
    www.FrancescoFragomeni.com

  10. #10
    Neanderman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Ohio River Valley
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    575
    Where is the tutorial on reloading?
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin