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  1. #1
    billschwab's Avatar
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    Wet Plate Holder - 8x10

    Hand made, dedicated wet plate collodion holder that can be used with any 8x10 camera without modification. Although this holder may show a few minor glue and cosmetic marks associated with hand-made construction, it has been used to test light-tight, it is being sold as new.

    -8x10 Wet Plate Holder
    -Plate size approx 9.75 x 7.75 inches
    -Works with glass or aluminum plates
    -Glass backing plate included (not needed for glass plates)
    -Tension sprint attached (no need for loose springs)
    -Satisfaction Assured

    For a kind and positive review, read Matt Magruder's post. He was one of my testers and I am very happy he liked the holder.

    APUG Price: $300.00 US - shipping is 10.50 in continental US for USPS Priority Flat Rate Medium Box - 44.50 for USPS International Priority Mail

    (Planned retail for these will be 350.00 through our web site and any dealers)

    Sorry.. Payment accepted vial Paypal only at this time. If interested or have questions, please feel free to PM me.

    Thanks for looking!

    Bill
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails holder_front.jpg   holder_back.jpg   holder_open.jpg  

  2. #2

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    Hi Bill, I am thinking that if I am to get in to collodion (after my wife divorces me ), I would probably start at 4x5...when are you likely to have a design ready for that, and what is the likely cost? Rgds, K
    Kal Khogali

    www.kal-khogali.com


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    "Wake up, dream, and photograph what you have seen.
    Don't wake up, photograph, and dream of what could have been."

  3. #3
    billschwab's Avatar
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    Hi Kal,

    Unfortunately a 4x5 still eludes me. The size makes it difficult to engineer with the current design and due to this, I think the cost would be prohibitive for a quarter plate holder.

    What I am working on now is a modification of current holders with a trapped door and spring style addition to the back side which would eliminate the need for 2 slides and loose springs. I'm still a ways off on this however. Getting component parts milled for the 8x10s has been the focus.

    Thanks for the interest, Kal!

    Bill
    Last edited by billschwab; 03-17-2010 at 11:30 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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  5. #5

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    bummer about the 4x5....a few more questions....Is going to 8x10 a big step from no knowledge?...and can collodion be self-taught, or am I going to have to go on a course?...need to find if I can get the ready to use chemicals here in Europe, since the issue I have at home is that my wife just doesn't trust all the mixing etc (she thinks I will screw it up and blow up the house!).

    Also, what happens whith the liquid run-off from the holders, will I experience the chemicals leaking and do I have to protect the Camera in some way....I may go for 8x10 (and one of your holders), just need to resolve some issues.

    Rgds, K

    PS If you think this conversation is best done on PM, let me know!
    Kal Khogali

    www.kal-khogali.com


    Visit my Photo Scrap Book

    www.shutteringeye.wordpress.com


    "Wake up, dream, and photograph what you have seen.
    Don't wake up, photograph, and dream of what could have been."

  6. #6
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    I'm in the same boat, Kal. I've decided that with my learning style, and how unfamiliar I am with wetplate, that personal instruction is the way to go (wise, considering some of the chemistry involved). Going to Photostock to see for myself...your questions are the same as mine, basically.

  7. #7
    billschwab's Avatar
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    To be honest, I think 8x10 is even easier than smaller plates. I learned by doing whole plates, but then went smaller. For a long time I did only quarter and half plates. If you feel more comfortable and econimic with smller plates, you can always use inserts.

    if you want to start small, it is pretty easy to modify a fidelity holder by having a machine shop cut 1/4 plate hole in the septum. Then use epoxy to glue small, acrylic or aluminum corners and you're pretty much ready to go. You'll need to cut a backing glass plate to size if you are doing aluminum plates. If glass, all you need is a spring to give tension on the plate. I use a strip of bowed scrap trophy aluminum.

    As for chemical run-off and mess, there is always some. But if you keep your workflow clean, dry off the back of the plates after treatment in the silver nitrate bath and keep the holder wiped out between each plate, you can minimize the mess and anything on your camera. I use a LOT of paper towel when I work to keep it clean and dry, but beware that as much as you try, something will get somewhere. It is the nature of the process.

    It is possible to teach yourself, but very beneficial to work with someone your first time. It cuts out a lot of trial and error. It also gives you insight into how the chemicals are handled safely. This takes away a lot of the intimidation. I also found that Coffer's DVD's were very helpful. By the time I went out to work with Kerik, I had a pretty good knowledge of th process, but had just never poured a plate. When I got working at it for real with K, it was pretty easy. I came home and went solo right away. Had I gone it alone, it would have taken me much longer.

    Hope this all helps!

    Bill

  8. #8

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    Hi Bill.....sent you a message on your website...seems you don't have PM on APUG? Please drop me a line! Rgds, Kal
    Kal Khogali

    www.kal-khogali.com


    Visit my Photo Scrap Book

    www.shutteringeye.wordpress.com


    "Wake up, dream, and photograph what you have seen.
    Don't wake up, photograph, and dream of what could have been."



 

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