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  1. #61
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Has anyone considered that older TriX 35mm was packed in individual foild and air tight cans?

    Today's plastic cans are not air tight!

    Being in a freezer, especially a modern frost free freezer will cause severe changes to the environment of the film, but in the old sealed packages they were kept isolated from the freezer environment.

    So, things have changed. For the worse I suspect.

    Don't get overconfident about freezers.

    PE

  2. #62
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    PE, interesting statement re steel vs plastic cans. There are plastic and steel cans for 120 film available on the market, what about them?
    I'm not troubled by freezers at all. I store my Fooji stock with the chooks, rissoles, bangers, peas, tripe and kanga tail. Never once have I observed a deranged film (the chooks are occasionally deranged). And some film is still waiting to be processed. Eight years after exposure. I'll get around to it eventually.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  3. #63
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    The point is - "what does a frost free freezer do to the environment that film experiences". Yeas ago, the film was sealed in a plastic bag in a cannister at 70 deg F (20 C) and 50% RH at EK. Today, the same is true but the containers are not air tight!

    So, unless you seal your film containers, there is no protection from swings in humidity and I suspect you may experience dryout, cracking and water spots among other possible long-term effects. I have not given this enough thought until this thread came along!

    PE

  4. #64
    tomalophicon's Avatar
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    I put all my film into air tight plastic bags if they are going into the freezer. Even unopened 120 or sheet film. Just in case.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    Prohibitive for one box of Tri-X. Not so bad with a chest freezer full of film.

    Well said!

    This just shows how relative everything really is. It all boils down to what its worth to *you*;

    subjective vs. objective value.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Has anyone considered that older TriX 35mm was packed in individual foild and air tight cans?

    Today's plastic cans are not air tight!

    Being in a freezer, especially a modern frost free freezer will cause severe changes to the environment of the film, but in the old sealed packages they were kept isolated from the freezer environment.

    So, things have changed. For the worse I suspect.

    Don't get overconfident about freezers.

    PE
    In the modern day, if someone went to the bother of stocking and refrigerating large quantities of fim, they should consider going the extra mile to vacuum seal each pro-pack (5 roll bundle) individually. The plastic sheeting is meant to withstand long periods of sub-zero temps (freezers) to food standards, without degrading.

  7. #67
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Sorry, but vacuum sealing may be just as bad, as it can "dry" the film too much. There are organic chemicals in coatings that help plasticize it and help with keeping of the emulsion.

    The idea of air tight plastic bags is a very good one.

    PE

  8. #68
    viridari's Avatar
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    Perhaps Kodak could be broken up? The film division claimed to have strong sales in 2010 and 2011. With more effective management, perhaps they can be spun off and have a go on their own?

  9. #69
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    I didn't know the plastic cans weren't air tight. What about the 120 and sheet film foil?

    Seems simple enough to seal in plastic zip locks or the like, but I don't know about getting the humidity just so in them.

  10. #70
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Unopened 120, 220 and Sheet films in foil wrappers are air tight!

    PE



 

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