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  1. #41

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    I have a friend who sleeps with his iPad, many of my students say their phone is their right hand - they never stop talking about them.

    Aristophane's idea of "analogue irony" is interesting but it does require one to seek out the the sort of extreme cases that by no coincidence also draw journalists to them. It's a peculiar trait to worship the machine that helped you create art, one which I think is rather limited but appears more predominant on account of online news articles that seek this very thing to make good copy.
    Steve.

  2. #42
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aristophanes View Post
    Lots of digital cameras have no Bayer filter. Digital is rapidly catching up to analog's theoretical limitations and will pass soon enough. In fact, in scientific and turnkey instrumentation, it already has by substantial margins.
    Curious how that works, since analog audio (for example) at it's theoretical best would be an exact replication of the frequency and amplitude of the original moment, and all the information contained therein.

    To my mind digital is about saving space and faithful replication. (I do use it) As the sample rate goes and the steps get smaller it more and more simply imitates an analog curve. Personally, I think digital will simply evolve back to a far superior analog than the one we know.

  3. #43
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    Emulsions are already what nano digital technology is dreaming about. With your bare eyes you can see millions more tones on an analog print than any digital can record and process. Hard to beat.
    Digital audio fatigue is obvious once you experience the soothing of high-end analog equipment. If you can't objectively measure it, it means your measuring equipment or methode is not good enough. They used to say there is no evidence the Earth is not flat back in the day, remember?

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    Curious how that works, since analog audio (for example) at it's theoretical best would be an exact replication of the frequency and amplitude of the original moment, and all the information contained therein.

    To my mind digital is about saving space and faithful replication. (I do use it) As the sample rate goes and the steps get smaller it more and more simply imitates an analog curve. Personally, I think digital will simply evolve back to a far superior analog than the one we know.
    A digital sensor is an analog device. The limitation has been the conversion at speed (bandwidth) compared to film, and the need to interpret the data due to inherent weaknesses in the sensor design. Film nailed the latter quite some time ago, but has other limitations, not the least of which is ISO and low-light application. Film still has superior density of information, but gets that density with the trade-off of simply needing more photons.

    Sensor designs are constantly being upgraded preserving the waveform signal with greater, stepless fidelity with each generation. RAW, no Bayer filters, less processing, and lenses designed for the sensors (like Leica) will make for less reliance on the signal processor and more like analog, but with hugely variable ISO (per pixel even) amongst other advancements. Film hit its theoretical maximum and has other limitations, such as the cost and variables of processing.

    It's just moot if one hates Photoshop, like I do. One thing I do agree with the article is that older analog processes force some discipline and formalism into the process. Locking into a linear process can be creatively liberating. You have a limited set of tools can free the imagination rather than shopping for new tools constantly. That's the essence, for example, of b/w photography. Something is removed from the visual and aesthetic toolkit.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aristophanes View Post

    I'm sure some sleep with their Leica's. On APUG there's sometimes a weird Olympus love-in going on.
    Ha, you see Aristophanes, you are an angry man. You cannot even see the humor and rather throw little zingers to get under people's skins. I don't know about anyone else, but I sleep very nicely with my wife and my love fest with any camera is simply to the extent of taking pictures and let it the spit out a negative so I can print it. And, discussing the virtues of a particular camera, or lens, in a forum, can be even fun and instructive once in a while. Of course, you find that strange as well.

  6. #46
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    Secret digital-stroker, aka Aristophanes. You're completely ignoring the point of healthy limitations and non-linear curves yet again.

    Say it with me:

    Non-linear.
    Non-linear.
    Non-linear.

    If you've shot film with any seriousness you'd understand the power of this.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  7. #47
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    Anyway...internet trolls aside, I am happy the journalist in question (whom I'm also acquainted with) took the time to write an interesting piece about an interesting subject. Let's not forget that.

    People can take or leave what they want out of that, but if nothing else it's good to be reminded that we still live in a world where people can have a variety of 'brushes' with which to paint their pictures with.
    "Never criticize someone until you've walked a mile in their shoes. That way, you're a mile away and you've got their shoes."

    MY BLOG - www.reservedatalltimes.com
    YOU SHOULD LOOK AT THIS SITE - www.colincorneau.com
    INSTAGRAM: colincorneau

  8. #48
    CGW
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    Helped a couple friends restore/rebuild a nice old letterpress last month. Type+ink+great paper=magic.

  9. #49
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    Helped a couple friends restore/rebuild a nice old letterpress last month. Type+ink+great paper=magic.
    I visited a museum in Sweden where they still use the old letter presses to make things on order, like menus for restaurants, etc. Very interesting; they were even able to make a pretty good self sustaining business out of something where visitors to the museum can come and look at the machines, talk to the people working there, and be wowed by both the beautiful printed materials as well as the fairly pungent 'aroma' of the inks. Very interesting.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lionel1972 View Post
    ... Proof is that in order to "improve" digital imagery, they now tend to introduce curves and grain to make it more pleasant to look at than the harsh binarity and linearity of digital images.
    That's an excellent point. Remember back in the 1980's when those computer-generated drum machines came out to replace real drummers? The manufacturers soon found out that perfect note spacing sounded dead and uninteresting, so they programmed in a human-like randomness. Still, it doesn't sound like a human drummer; it's a computerized approximation of one. You won't notice the difference on a galloping horse.

    And at some level, perhaps smaller than you can easily see, Photoshopped images don't look like film photography, they are just an approximation of it. A very elaborate and increasingly accurate approximation, but an approximation nonetheless.

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